Reputation
1,277
Top tag
Next privilege 1,500 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
4 12
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~9k people reached

Aug
1
comment How is the Kanji character 豚 related to the chinese 猪 / 豬
The part where you ask for the Mandarin reading is really best served by self-research. However, the second half of your question -- why Japanese uses different characters for certain Chinese concepts -- is a good one.
Aug
1
answered How is the Kanji character 豚 related to the chinese 猪 / 豬
Jul
27
comment Tone of 竟 and 境 in Mandarin and Cantonese
Thanks for a well-researched answer.
Jul
27
revised Tone of 竟 and 境 in Mandarin and Cantonese
added 16 characters in body
Jul
27
asked Tone of 竟 and 境 in Mandarin and Cantonese
Jun
9
comment Written Cantonese Pronunciation
Can you give some examples?
Jun
1
answered Simplification of 蘭(兰)
May
16
comment What is the most complex simplifed character?
@BertR. Thanks. In a frequency list I've included in the answer, 蠢 and 攀 have comparable frequencies, although 蠢 is the more common one.
May
16
answered What is the most complex simplifed character?
May
16
comment Referring to great-grandparents
Another fun fact: kinship systems like Chinese in which each relation has a separate name are known as Sudanese, presumably after an archetypal instance.
May
16
awarded  Editor
May
16
revised Referring to great-grandparents
deleted 20 characters in body
May
16
answered Referring to great-grandparents
May
16
comment Referring to great-grandparents
dusan means whether there's different words for: mother's mother's mother, mother's mother's father, mother's father's mother, etc. in the same way that we distinguish 祖母, 外祖母, etc.
May
15
comment What is the most complex simplifed character?
I've always marvelled at 攀...
May
13
accepted The development of rhotic vowels in Mandarin
May
13
comment The development of rhotic vowels in Mandarin
Thanks. My university has copies of both; I'll definitely take a look.
May
13
awarded  Commentator
May
13
comment The development of rhotic vowels in Mandarin
Yes, that explanation makes sense. The final stop would have had to have been present to block the metathesis. Incidentally, do you know of any reference work about these and similar sound changes?
May
13
comment The development of rhotic vowels in Mandarin
You're right, all the sound changes you've described are not particularly hard to imagine. The missing link was that /ʐɨ/ metathesised to /ɨʐ/ -- thanks for making that clear!