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bio website overpunch.com
location Sydney, Australia
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen yesterday

I am a computational linguistics PhD candidate. But before that, long before that, I fell in love with languages.

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Aug
12
comment What happened to the Old Chinese coda -p of 拉 in Cantonese?
Right, which is why I'm reluctant to accept this answer even though it's a good guess.
Aug
10
comment What happened to the Old Chinese coda -p of 拉 in Cantonese?
When linguists study diachronic sound change they don't just pronounce the sounds and say 'that sounds reasonable'. Sound change does in general follow a 'strict formula'.
Aug
10
comment What happened to the Old Chinese coda -p of 拉 in Cantonese?
Are you proposing that 拉 originally had an *-s final, and that the expected form in Cantonese should have had the reflex of 去 tone, but (unpredictably) ended up in the first tone instead?
Aug
10
comment What happened to the Old Chinese coda -p of 拉 in Cantonese?
Again I don't think that's true -- the combination laap exists in 蠟, 臘 and others. I do concede that I can't think of an example that appears in tone 1, but my question would then be whether this change is regular, and if so, what drives the change.
Aug
10
comment What happened to the Old Chinese coda -p of 拉 in Cantonese?
I didn't downvote this, but this is obviously untrue: there are plenty of Cantonese syllables ending in -aap, one of which I included as an example...
Aug
9
comment Pinyinated 'm' with four tone marks?
Accented m is clearly not 'outside Unicode' since it can be represented using combining characters: m̀
Apr
22
comment What's the difference between 番茄 and 西红柿?
番茄 is regular in Hong Kong Cantonese as well.
Mar
24
comment In pinyin, why is there an inconsistency between bo, po, suo, duo etc
My point is that because there are no such syllables *do, *so, *lo, the syllables duo, suo, luo etc. could be written as such without introducing ambiguity.
Feb
2
comment How does foreign word transliteration work in the context of Cantonese vs Mandarin?
@dda. Yes indeed. Consider 道琼斯 (Dow Jones), which is dou6 king4 si1 in Cantonese.
Oct
2
comment Reasons for Chinese changing from monosyllabic to disyllabic?
I disagree with this answer. If anything, formal contexts in modern Chinese generate more, not fewer disyllabic words. Plus, there's no relationship whatsoever with 'Traditional Chinese', whatever that means. Perhaps the poster is referring to the fact that the lexicons of some topolects (including Cantonese) exhibit more monosyllabic terms.
Mar
30
comment Using 變音 when reading Classical Chinese poetry in Cantonese
I guessed that the tone constraints would settle this, but I wasn't sure if they applied to this style of poetry. Thanks for the details.
Mar
11
comment How to describe differences between Cantonese and Mandarin?
This answer is closer to the truth. I opened my copy of 汉语方言词汇 and picked ten words randomly: 切, 台阶, 整齐, 亲戚, 拍马, 电筒, 嘴, 打冷颤, 钱, 蜂蜜. Only two of them are completely different in Cantonese (台阶 and 拍马), one of them is clearly cognate to the Cantonese (打冷颤), and two of them have the characters reversed in Cantonese (整齐, 蜂蜜).
Mar
11
comment How to describe differences between Cantonese and Mandarin?
Sadly also wrong. Cantonese and Mandarin may not be as close as American and British English, as another erroneous answer says, but to say they have only the written word in common is wrong, very wrong.
Mar
7
comment Cantonese jyutping Tone 4 question “throat should be vibrating”
@dda: Independent of the distinction between a and aa, tone 3 has longer duration.
Mar
6
comment Cantonese jyutping Tone 4 question “throat should be vibrating”
I've recorded the six tones in an audio file here: cl.ly/420Z2n1y2u1c -- Ultimately, the tone numbers are only a rough indication. You can listen to recordings of native speakers, but every speaker has a different dynamic range.
Jan
23
comment Resources for learning Cantonese
(I just noticed, the jyutping should of course be bin3jam1...)
Jan
22
comment Resources for learning Cantonese
@StumpyJoePete: The best resource I've found on pin3jam1, as the phenomenon is sometimes called, is in Bauer & Benedict (1997) "Modern Cantonese Phonology". To answer your question, it's not regularly triggered by anything. The comparison to erhua is appropriate; like it, pin3jam1 has among its functions a non-productive noun->verb derivational affix, a verb->noun derivational affix and a marker of familiarity.
Jan
22
comment Resources for learning Cantonese
It's not often pointed out that the phonology of Hong Kong Cantonese is actually less alien to most English speakers than Standard Mandarin. The only sounds which aren't present for many speakers of English are the vowels [y] and [œ], and marginally also syllable-initial [ŋ] (which young HK speakers drop anyway). Standard Mandarin has the retroflex and palatal series, as well as [ɤ], which pose problems for a lot of learners. There are indeed 6 tones in Hong Kong Cantonese, but on the other hand there isn't tone sandhi like there is in Mandarin.
Dec
9
comment Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
Thanks for a well-researched answer. I suspected there would be literature about this. Do any of the references suggest when the change took place? As I said above, the fact that Korean borrowings preserve final -m and -p in these cases allows the date of the sound change to be bounded on one side.
Dec
7
comment Dissimilation of bilabial finals following Middle Chinese (法, 品, 凡)
I only know that it would have happened before the main borrowing of Chinese readings into Korean, since those preserve the original finals. As for your second question, let's use Cantonese: 品 became ban2 and 凡 became faan4: bilabial finals became alveolar finals.