1,244 reputation
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location Scotland, United Kingdom
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 8 hours ago

Dec
13
comment Meaning of 脏话 in 这里能说脏话吗
From the context of what was going in at the time, I reckon it must have been #3
Dec
13
accepted Meaning of 脏话 in 这里能说脏话吗
Dec
12
comment Does 从来 translate to “always”?
yellowbridge.com/chinese/sentsearch.php?word=%E4%BB%8E%E6%9D%A5 maybe someone more proficient can give more advice about whether it only makes sense in certain contexts etc
Dec
12
comment Meaning of 脏话 in 这里能说脏话吗
It seems like a rather strange thing to say though?!
Dec
12
asked Meaning of 脏话 in 这里能说脏话吗
Dec
10
accepted How to congratulate someone on getting a new job?
Dec
10
comment How to congratulate someone on getting a new job?
@fabregaszy so literally translated those would both be more like do a good job, but actually mean something like good luck with the new job?
Dec
10
comment How to congratulate someone on getting a new job?
@fabregaszy What is the meaning of 加油?
Dec
10
comment How to congratulate someone on getting a new job?
@fabregaszy in 好好干, what does mean?
Dec
9
asked How to congratulate someone on getting a new job?
Dec
3
comment Difference between 我饿了 and 我很饿?
@50-3 this is also how we would express it in UK (proper ;) English
Nov
26
comment Difference between 我饿了 and 我很饿?
@xiaohouzi79 I'm guessing QuestionOverflow is American? I think some Americans would say "I'm hungry already!"
Oct
23
comment Complimenting someone on their appearance
Can you add translations for 姣好 and 俏丽? (I can't find these in online dictionaries)
Oct
21
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
16
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
9
revised Are there any free fonts designed to help learn/read Chinese?
Spelling
Sep
5
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
24
comment Similar pronunciations of tea/茶 across languages
I've heard some colleagues from Teeside (north east England) use it, so it does still get at least some usage :)
Jun
24
comment Similar pronunciations of tea/茶 across languages
As an aside, some English people refer to a "cup a' cha", meaning a "cup of tea". english.stackexchange.com/questions/18152/…
May
20
awarded  Enthusiast