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Dec
31
comment Expressing the location: 哪里 or 哪儿?
I see, fairly clear, thanks... Two thing: (1) in my question you corrected "nă li" to "nă lĭ": doesn't the second character lose its tone in this case? (2) here "哪里 can mean something els;perhaps you know", you are saying that 哪里 means "perhaps you know"?
Dec
29
comment How are the terms for “male/female” and “man/woman” divided exactly?
@NullUserException If the etymology is lost, then yes. But if you know the etymology (so the reasons to be searched in its development and history in usage), then it's answerable.
Dec
29
comment How are the terms for “male/female” and “man/woman” divided exactly?
@NullUserException They can ask that in the Italian SE when it enters Beta eheheh :D Of course my "why" is a referment to possible etymology information and not to be taken as "Why are you doing that?"
Dec
28
comment Where can I find sorted word lists used by native students?
If you could provide some of these results, it would be nice. Not all of us can google in Chinese. :P
Dec
28
comment How do we wish someone to get better?
I took the liberty of changing some of the formatting. :) I think your answer does it all, and I don't see others adding more info, so I'll accept yours. :)
Dec
28
comment Which fonts show the stroke order of all characters?
@magnetar There is a tag "simplified", so we know it refers to Mandarin.
Dec
28
comment Which fonts show the stroke order of all characters?
Ok, but that character, when you click in "ja", it specifies it's Japanese and not Chinese, "ja.wiktionary.org/...". That link I provided in the example, belongs to this: "Printable black and white images showing common or specific to China stroke order...".
Dec
28
comment Which fonts show the stroke order of all characters?
@fefe Where did you read that? There's only links to Chinese stuff in the details below. There's also a quick reference to Japanese too, but as a whole project, not for the character itself.
Dec
27
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
@Petruza No problem! And lucky you, I don't think I am already the "tell them apart" phase... :) But I'm struggling!
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
I guess we have to agree to disagree... :) But don't you think that SH for both "SH" and "X" is confusing? They're not the same sounds, why would you use the same letters?
Dec
26
comment Have any fonts been released that are based on slender gold?
Ah, I apologize for my lack of knowledge. :D Now that you say it, I recognize some characters...
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
Q and ZH are not the same sound, so using only "CH" for both would not be enough. Besides, in italian "CH" is "K", in french it's roughly "SH" and in german it's a voiceless velar frcative, like in "ICH". Only in Spanish it is "tch" as in "watch". Note that "TS" is not necessarily the same as "C" in Chinese. Again, we go back to the point: you want to base pinyin on european languages. Pinyin is not there for who doesn't learn Chinese, but to provide a small aid for those who are learning it.
Dec
26
comment Have any fonts been released that are based on slender gold?
I'm already getting the Simplified one! :D Is "鋼筆書法" free too or is it for purchase? It looks good. :) +1 by the way.
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
More or less in European languages and not in the same conditions. But that would be too long for a comment... :P But a question arises: Why should there be a system for those who don't learn it? I don't think there is a need for (or that there should be) an additional system (or a replacing system for pinyin) expressly for non-learners.
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
Ok, but then we would need to create a different pinyin for each other language and that was my point: each of us has different rules when it comes to reading. If Chinese had to satisfy each of us, there would be a "french pinyin", a "spanish pinyin", an "italian pinyin", and so on. While now there's only one and all you need to do is learn it. The references are plenty.
Dec
26
comment Site for reading the same news article in English and Chinese (简体中文)
If you find it, do you mind sharing the link here? It would be interesting for everyone... :D
Dec
26
comment Where can I find recordings of people reading things now that mp3.baidu.com is dead?
Can you also add if it requires registration? Is the registration free? Are there copyright issues? Such info would add more value to your answer.
Dec
26
comment Site for reading the same news article in English and Chinese (简体中文)
You say "was", "used to" and other verbs in the past tense because the site doesn't exist anymore?
Dec
26
comment How does Wikipedia's simplified to traditional converter work?
@DonKirkby Uhm It still seems too related to software. Anyway, I wanted to be clear that this questions is not a bad one (and as you can see I didn't down vote), it's an interesting question to me as well, but I think that the knowledge required to answer is more on the computer side than the chinese side.
Dec
25
comment Where can I find recordings of people reading things now that mp3.baidu.com is dead?
So it's a search engine for stories recorded by "normal" people? Was the quality good? Apart from background noises?