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Apr
21
comment Characters for Taiwanese
I'm confused by the question. 遮雨 does represent the Taiwanese characters for j(l)ia-hōo.
Apr
17
answered How To *Write* The Northeastern ‘ber lou’?
Apr
17
comment How To *Write* The Northeastern ‘ber lou’?
These characters are almost certainly not in the Kangxi Dictionary! I've checked every component as a radical, and it doesn't seem to exist.
Apr
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
23
reviewed Reject What's the difference between 学 and 学习?
Mar
16
answered Can the famous paradox 白马非马 be translated into English?
Mar
16
answered What's the way to say “too/also/as well” in Taiwanese?
Mar
9
answered Translation: 机制 (better translations)
Mar
6
comment What is the relationship between vernacular and literary Chinese?
Before the New Culture Movement of the early twentieth century, no form of Mandarin was used in official written bureaucracy. The Ming and Qing dynasties would have used literary Chinese for that purpose, although the stylistic influence of the local Mandarin may have been present. Bureaucratic style would have thus been very different from the vernacular written Chinese of the novels at the time.
Feb
28
awarded  Yearling
Feb
6
answered A more formal way
Jan
26
revised Difference between alveolars and alveolo-palatals in Cantonese
added 24 characters in body
Jan
26
answered Difference between alveolars and alveolo-palatals in Cantonese
Jan
23
comment Chinese Words that Accurately Reflect English Phonemes
(2) will be the problem. You're going to be wanting combinations of phonemes which do not exist in standard Mandarin: /w/ + /u/ is one of them.
Jan
19
comment Chinese words for “accent”
Estuary English is not Received Pronunciation, neither traditional RP nor modern RP. Neither is it Cockney, nor MLE.
Jan
13
answered Help to translate “红烧肉” to a foreigner
Jan
5
comment In which Chinese topolect might 門 be transcribed as <mum>?
Toisanese preserves -n usually, and like most Chinese varieties would modify the nasal to -ng in colloquial layers. Also, *m--m looks like it violates the labial dissimilation rule that Yue varieties of Chinese follow. I'd guess it's just a marketer's pun!
Dec
22
answered Medieval Chinese Pronunciation
Dec
19
comment Specially formatted Xiehouyu: What are they? What others are there?
Seems similar to Cockney Rhyming Slang as used in actual practice, for example "I'm goin' up 'e ap'les" [ɒɪm 'gaʊɪn ɐp ʔi æpʔoz] for "I'm going up the stairs". It has been called hemiteleia, most famously picked up in Bryson's work "Mother Tongue".
Dec
15
comment Character 瞓: where did the pronunciations come from?
Other examples of Old Chinese Baxter-Sagart *qh > modern Cantonese f- include 熏 and 葷. There's also *qwh for 化, 揮; *qhʕ for 呼, *ɢʕ for 乎, *qwhʕ for 賄 etc. The vast majority of these are x + some sort of glide in Middle Chinese. Lots of velar and "guttural/laryngeal" Middle Chinese initial consonants developed to f- in Cantonese before the 合口 glide w.