844 reputation
316
bio website hackingchinese.com
location Sweden
age
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Jan 23 at 20:52

I'm a language student and teacher who has quite a lot of opinions on how to learn languages more efficiently. Since I think there is a severe lack of people discussing how to learn (rather than just what to learn), I'm running a website called Hacking Chinese, welcome!


May
30
comment Pronunciation of 山 (in Taiwan)
Instead, this is the result of influences from other Chinese dialects, mostly 閩南, which (as far as I know) doesn't have these sounds.
May
30
comment Pronunciation of 山 (in Taiwan)
Although you might be right in that a long occupation affects a language, I simply think this is completely unrelated to what we're talking about here. Are you suggesting that because 山 is pronounced "san" in Japanese, all retroflex sounds are affect in Taiwanese Mandarin, including zh/ch? Since the same phenomenon is prominent across southern China, I find it very hard to believe that this is related to Japanese.
May
29
comment Pronunciation of 山 (in Taiwan)
I would like to add that most Taiwanese people do make a difference between s/sh, z/zh and c/ch, but it's not as prominent and the difference might be lost on people used to a Northern dialect.
May
29
comment Pronunciation of 山 (in Taiwan)
Since most retroflex initials are affected, I really don't think Japanese is relevant.
May
27
comment How many characters do I need to learn?
I have checked a frequency list and added characters from it now and then (mostly for fun, I don't think this is the best way of learning new characters). I'm now at 5400 and i think I stopped learning really useful characters at around 4000. After that, there are many place names, surnames and characters that only appear in one or two words that are themselves not very common. 3500-4000 will enable you to read most normal texts in modern Chinese. (Note: I'm referring to traditional characters here, not sure exactly how simplified would differ.)
Apr
22
comment What is the difference between 变成、变化、变得、改变、转变?
This answer seems really good to me. It matches both my 語感 (non-native but advanced learner) and what I have seen/heard from people who rely on considerably more than a feeling. Great!
Apr
21
comment What's the pronunciation of 不在乎
It's fairly normal for dictionaries not to write the citation form of characters, i.e. not include tone changes. It's of course even more common for third tones, you will never see ni2hao3 in a dictionary.
Apr
10
comment Is there a rule of thumb for distinguishing male and female names in Chinese?
I added that comment because @AntiGameZ comment made it sound that it's not possible, but I don't think the OP was after an answer that was 100% certain. Saying that it's not possible is simply wrong in my opinion, it's often very clear with a high accuracy, although obviously not 100%.
Apr
8
comment Chinese computer vocabulary, and most frequently encountered common computer terms
Interesting site! I found the design quite horrible and it's hard to navigate, but it's really cool that most phrases and vocabulary are recorded by more than one speaker.
Apr
8
comment Chinese computer vocabulary, and most frequently encountered common computer terms
Thumbs up for that link! I used it quite a lot while translating software from English to Chinese. That and a decent dictionary covers almost everything!
Apr
1
comment Still confused about putting 了 at the end of a sentence or right after the verb
Chinese doesn't have tense and telling people that 了 denotes past tense is really, really bad, because it effectively hinders them from learning how to actually use 了. See Question Overflow's answer above.
Mar
28
comment Is there a rule of thumb for distinguishing male and female names in Chinese?
Still, I think in most cases you can guess correctly with >95% accuracy?
Mar
15
comment Chinese [Topolectical] IPA Placeholder: Ẓ
So this is still speculation, but it seems like the underdot is used to mark vocalic consonants in some Indian languages. Now, the i in zi, ci, si is not miles away from a [z], but is still treated as a vowel, so perhaps this is where the ẓ came from? (Or, the other way around.)
Mar
14
answered Table of Chinese characters taught in primary school, grouped by grade
Mar
9
comment Chinese [Topolectical] IPA Placeholder: Ẓ
That's what I tried to speculate about. IPA generally only uses small caps (e.g. ʙ and ɢ). A small caps z would be virtually identical to a lower case z, so I don't think the capitalisation you mention is significant. This Wikipedia article also mentions that capital versions of small capitals are also obsolete in general: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/….
Mar
8
comment Chinese [Topolectical] IPA Placeholder: Ẓ
Regarding the original question, I don't know, but it might be a rest from when upper/lower case was used in handwritten IPA?
Mar
8
comment Chinese [Topolectical] IPA Placeholder: Ẓ
I disagree, I think that adults learning Chinese can benefit a lot from seeing actual phonetic transcription of Chinese sounds, rather than Pinyin. Often, mimicking someone else just isn't enough. This isn't unique for Chinese, it's the same reason IPA is sometimes used to teach other languages as well. Of course, this shouldn't be the first thing students do (unless they happen to be very familiar with IPA already), but I definitely think that it's beneficial.
Mar
7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
5
comment Is there a significant difference in meaning between “欢迎你到中国来” and “欢迎你来到中国”?
I don't know how this relates to the other answers here, but the 來到 construction is the norm in Taiwan. I have spoken to several people from the mainland who comment on this and point out that the 規範 way of saying it in China is 到...來. I have heard several people say that this kind of construction is one of the reasons they can say that I have studied mostly in Taiwan, although this seems a bit unlikely since pronunciation (mostly 輕聲 usage, or the lack of it) is more likely to give me away.
Feb
27
comment How do you idiomatically transate 你这个人?
Perhaps a variation of @StumpyJoePete's answer works too, just leaving out the <insert word of varying level of insult> and say "Why, you little..., how can you..." After all, it's not uncommon to omit the word of insult in English!