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location Netherlands
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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen May 6 '12 at 20:57

Here.


Feb
5
comment Is 再过[时间] the most common way of expressing “in [amount of time], something will happen”?
"再过" ~= "等" or "再等"
Jan
29
comment 一起 vs 一块 - what's the difference?
Seems to me, "一起" is more formal, while "一块(儿)" is rather oral and informal.
Jan
19
comment What's the meaning of 缘分 in English?
fate? destiny? chemical? karma?
Jan
19
comment What's the meaning of 缘分 in English?
Nice question! +1
Dec
18
comment What is the difference in use between 以及, 和 and 与?
Found an article about it in Chinese, motranslator.mysinablog.com/…. In many cases, they are somewhat interchangeable. is much more common in informal oral Chinese, while or 以及 are used mostly in written language. These are just personal perception.
Dec
17
comment Sentence structure “I'm [doing something] because [reason]”?
Wow, just realized this part is really not that easy to explain in English. I will post a question for this when I have the time. ;) For now, FYI, this part is oral Chinese, somewhat not that standard, but as I know, quite common and nature.
Dec
17
comment Sentence structure “I'm [doing something] because [reason]”?
@drHannibalLecter Done that. Added few more things.
Dec
17
comment Sentence structure “I'm [doing something] because [reason]”?
To keep the Chinese translation in the same order as the English equivalent, you could say "之所以我现在正在做.. 是因为..."
Dec
16
comment Resources for learning classical Chinese
Searched a bit and also did not find anything valuable. As I can recall, classical Chinese is generally taught in high school using case-study. That is, to learn from famous articles, and teachers will do the explanation. While learning it, there are really A LOT exceptions to remember as I can recall.
Dec
16
comment Why is it possible to replace 都 with 也 in 什么都没有?
@drHannibalLecter No. These two phrases are examples to demonstrate that equals to both also/too and either in English. ;) Hope this helps.
Dec
15
comment “Actually” as a sentence-starter of speech filler
@AntiGameZ That's right. At first, I thought "实际上" is more similar to "事实上" without thinking too much. Now I get it...
Dec
15
comment What is the equivalent of the English word 'Fail' in Mandarin?
+1, 糗 is a quite nice answer too.
Dec
15
comment What is the equivalent of the English word 'Fail' in Mandarin?
+1 for 囧, hoho.
Dec
15
comment How widespread is the use of 妳?
ha, here is the reason for my impression. Another question would be, if 妳 can be replaced by 你 in traditional Chinese?
Dec
14
comment How do I say “damn!” or “bloody hell” in Chinese?
@Ciaocibai ha! Yes I am. Never knew that "哎呀" is commonly used in the South. ;)
Dec
14
comment Why do Chinese “extend” the last word when speaking?
I tried to say it in different ways, but ni hao maaaa does not really ring a bell. On the contrary, ma can be very short and shift the sentence into ni hao me ?. FYI, am Northerner, it could be a different story from Southerner. :P
Dec
14
comment How do I say “damn!” or “bloody hell” in Chinese?
@drHannibalLecter To me, "糟糕" seems only appear in novels and movies rather than in real life conversations. Meanwhile, the very similar things, "糟了" / "坏了", are used in the situations where one forgets something important or similar. E.g. when I forget my project report in a meeting to managers, I may say "糟了" or "坏了" or "靠" or "操" silently.
Dec
14
comment Why is it possible to replace 都 with 也 in 什么都没有?
Actually, as I can recall, there is no difference between "too" and "either" or "neither" in Chinese at all. E.g. 我也有iPhone <-> 我也没有iPhone. This may be the reason it is not even mentioned -- because there is no difference in Chinese as it is in English between positive and negative forms.
Dec
14
comment How do I say “damn!” or “bloody hell” in Chinese?
@drHannibalLecter That is really interesting to know. :D
Dec
14
comment Why is it possible to replace 都 with 也 in 什么都没有?
In this case, 也 equals to either/neither in English. That is, 也 can be used as also, too, either, neither. Sounds confusing. :P