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seen Mar 23 at 22:08

Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
You can put any example you want, none will be worst that using Q for its equivalent sound in chinese, the same with X, C, etc. I understand what you say and agree, Pinyin is for studying chinese. I get it, it's ok. I just say that it would be so easy to make others pronounce chinese right, and yet they have to say KS when they see an X.
Dec
26
revised Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
added 465 characters in body
Dec
26
awarded  Commentator
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
Yes, I'd love to read such studies, thanks!
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
What I say is if there was something like a "Relaxed Pinyin" wich would have CH instead of Q and ZH, SH instead of X, TS instead of C and Z, it just would allow everyone to pronunce chinese names correctly.
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
No, not each of us, but C, Q and X have a pretty standard common pronunciation across many languages and it happens to be quite different from Pinyin's. I know Pinyin and it works great for me, what I say is it doesn't work very well for people that don't learn chinese.
Dec
26
comment Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
The difference is that Pinyin is a romanization system while Spanish, English and Italian are not. Languages weren't created for foreigners to be able to read them, whereas Pinyin, supposedly, is. Pinyin is great for chinese students, as I am, but not for foreigners that want to pronounce chinese names right.
Dec
26
awarded  Editor
Dec
26
revised Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
added 47 characters in body
Dec
26
asked Why were some letters like Q, X, C, chosen for Pinyin which confuse non-Chinese speakers?
Dec
25
awarded  Teacher
Dec
21
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
@Szabolcs: I'm not sure, but I guess the notion of to have something in some way implies a completed past action, as to have something requires that you already got it. Actually, in spanish the auxiliary verb is not to have, but to be, as in there is (haber) which, not surprisingly, is the other meaning of 有. Also consider the similarities of have and haber
Dec
21
comment Etymology of 他妈的
It reminds me of "yo momma so fat..." jokes :D
Dec
21
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
@Mr. Shiny: see how this construct matches english, spanish, and may be other languages; 有 is to have as in possession, but it's also used for have as in have done. I think it's called an auxiliary verb.
Dec
21
comment Why is 有 (yǒu) the only verb that requires 没 while other verbs can use 不?
@Szabolcs: yes, 没有 is shortened 没 when preceding a verb.
Dec
21
answered Etymology of 汉语
Dec
21
answered Why do I see 我 for I, but is pronounced WAH
Dec
13
comment Reading handwriting
@JIStone: that's clever, because 的 has way too many strokes to be the most commonly used character :D
Dec
13
awarded  Supporter
Dec
13
answered The question about “很好”