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Jun
14
comment What is the first attested use of 美國/美国 in the sense of 'America' in Chinese?
Missing one of the most common ones... - “美帝”
Jun
11
answered Is there a single English word equivalent that means 人各有志?
Jun
11
answered Any direct English equivalent for “佩服”?
Jun
7
comment 說-speak? why translated as pleasant?
A more modern example (which is not technically 假借字) - mistakes like these can happen if you interpret non-Mandarin writing forms with Mandarin meaning. The famous saying 愛拼才會贏 comes from a modern Hokkien song, where 愛 actually means 需要, not 喜愛。 Totally different meaning!
Jun
5
revised 說-speak? why translated as pleasant?
added 17 characters in body
Jun
5
revised 說-speak? why translated as pleasant?
added 22 characters in body
Jun
5
revised 說-speak? why translated as pleasant?
added 22 characters in body
Jun
5
answered 說-speak? why translated as pleasant?
Jun
1
comment Pinyin to Chinese characters
Yes, but based on his question he only has the pinyin and not the actual characters. In other words he's asking for an inverse function from many values to one. That is impossible.
Jun
1
answered Pinyin to Chinese characters
Jun
1
comment 乐 Le and Yue: When did they diverge?
The Cantonese pronunciation corresponding to yue4 seems to be ngok6.
May
29
comment 上的 — How is it functioning in this sentence
中国历史学上的 more closely matches "in the historiography of China", not "in Chinese history". This corresponds to "in archaeology" later in the sentence. Both refer to academics, 学, not the subject of which was studied.
May
29
answered Is 我妈妈 or 我的妈妈 more natural?
May
29
comment Is this an accurate translation?
I think you're reverse-translating a bad translation.
May
29
comment Rhyming in modern Mandarin
I'd guess the rhyme tables you refer to are simply incorrect. I've heard singers occasionally elongating [ən] into [än] while singing, e.g. youtube.com/watch?v=U0Mxv3DJmvQ 1:40, but even in this case it's clear from the lyrics that yuan (which should more logically be written as yuian) is correctly considered to rhyme with []ian, and no other ending occurs with a genuine -uan. These are likely distinct enough sounds to almost everyone that conflation can only stem from their confusing representation in pinyin (yan should logically be "ian").
May
29
revised Rhyming in modern Mandarin
added 39 characters in body
May
27
awarded  Commentator
May
27
answered Rhyming in modern Mandarin
May
27
comment Strange pronunciations in Hakka song
The entire 來帮衬 is in Cantonese. The phrase 帮衬 also exists in Hakka, but is pronounced "bong cin", not "bong chan". This seems to be the only Cantonese used in the whole song; I suspect it's a combination of two reasons: 1. Malaysian stars are predominantly Cantonese speaking, and thus he uses Cantonese when referring to them, just like he pronounces 张惠妹 in Mandarin; 2. pronouncing 衬 as "chan" matches the common end-of-sentence rhyme of those stanzas
May
27
awarded  Yearling