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Jan
9
comment What does “kwukyel” mean in regards to Chinese language characters?
If they aren't "kwukyel" in Chinese language, what are they? They are 漢子 that are not in use in Mandarin Chinese.
Jan
7
comment What does “kwukyel” mean in regards to Chinese language characters?
For what it's worth, dictionaries using the Unihan database do not look too much into what's in it before making its contents available to the user. If a character is in the CJK range, it will show up and will be searchable.
Jan
7
comment What does “kwukyel” mean in regards to Chinese language characters?
And as for the dictionaries being wrong, they are not. 口訣 characters are Chinese characters, and whether they are used in Chinese or not is irrelevant. For instance 乫 is in ZDIC, acknowledged as a Korean-only character (and has a Mandarin pronunciation, jia1): zdic.net/z/15/js/4E6B.htm
Jan
7
comment What does “kwukyel” mean in regards to Chinese language characters?
You cannot prove a negative. 口訣 is a Korean-only thing, and is in the Unihan because it was (A) based on Chinese characters, and (B) used in conjunction with "regular" Chinese characters to write sounds specifics to Korean, like 乫 /kal/. They are 漢子, just not ones used in Mandarin. The same way 冇嘢唔 are 漢子, used in Cantonese and Hakka, and not in any other version of Chinese.
Jan
6
comment What does “kwukyel” mean in regards to Chinese language characters?
Unihan is for CJK. That's why your question is, I think, flawed: the title mentions "Chinese Characters", but the body of the questions says "Chinese". It is wrong to equate Chinese Characters and Chinese language. Per the UniHan page: "The Unihan database is the repository for the Unicode Consortium’s collective knowledge regarding the CJK Unified Ideographs contained in the Unicode Standard. It contains mapping data to allow conversion to and from other coded character sets and additional information to help implement support for the various languages which use the Han ideographic script."
Dec
24
comment Is there really no unicode for “扌𬙙”?
Sure and if I take my old paper dictionary that has 50k+ characters, it will probably be there. Doesn't have anything to do with Unicode organisation though. Note you said old dictionaries. Which were printed way before the Unicode was started. Don't assume all sinograms have a Unicode...
Dec
23
comment A Complex Chinese Character
Unfortunately answering in simplified characters doesn't help here... The characters are quite different from the 合文...
Sep
5
comment How is non-standard Cantonese spoken by some mainland Chinese speakers different from “standard” pronunciation?
Indeed. Plenty of strange accents out there. I also forgot to mention Malaysian Chinese, who mostly have tone variations, and some weird words sometimes. You can hear plenty of them in HK.
Jan
2
comment What is the Old Chinese Pronunciation for the Character 兮?
Viêtnamese hề, Cantonese hai4.
Dec
2
comment What is the difference between 台 and 臺?
Considering that 台 was in the 康熙字典, it's plain wrong to say that 台 is a 簡體字...
Nov
19
comment 足: why is “foot” also “enough”?
Nope. The papers for applying for a job is "résumé". Which means a summary (of your life). Not the same word at all...
Nov
19
comment How is 青 and 苍 used in classical Chinese to denote colors?
One thing is sure -- 苍 was not used in Classical Chinese... 蒼 on the other hand... :-)
Oct
1
comment Strange pronunciations in Hakka song
Yes, sorry, 嚟 [lai4 lei4] is the Cantonese equivalent of 來.
Sep
30
comment Strange pronunciations in Hakka song
Not sure. I'll put the mp3 through the Praat application (www.praat.org) to see if I can extract sonograms of the syllables in question.
Sep
25
comment Strange pronunciations in Hakka song
I hear lei too for 來. Kinda strange.
Sep
25
comment Cantonese Romanization schemes
Jyutping for Mac: rescomp.stanford.edu/~domingo2/Chinese.html
Sep
25
comment Cantonese Romanization schemes
"The Jyutping numeric tone markings are exactly the same as Yale's." Err no. Jyutping uses numbers...
Sep
8
comment How widespread is the use of 妳?
Saying "absolutely not legal Chinese characters" is ridiculous, since they exist and are attested even in Mainland dictionaries. I have left my paper 新华字典 in Shenzhen, but the other 2 Mainland dictionaries I have here list 嬭 as a Traditional version of 奶. They put (嬭) in parens, acknowledging their existence and "conversion" to simplified 奶. There's a whole world outside post-1949 Communist China, you know...
Aug
21
comment How can I find the exact written versions of commonly spoken Cantonese words?
"An example is the word 係, which is commonly spoken in Cantonese but not written." It is written, including by the government and companies in advertisings. I have plenty of examples showing this...
Jul
27
comment How to use “whether” in Chinese - do you need to say 如果?
Nice to see that some people still know to use whether instead of if...