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Aug
21
reviewed Leave Open English slang translation
Aug
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
16
comment When should I use “很” before an adjective?
I don't have time to write a proper answer, but the short version is that 很 is the default in these "X is Adj" sentences. If you use a different modifier (e.g., 非常), then it is in place of 很 (e.g., 我非常好). It's grammatically acceptable to drop 很, but it implies a comparison or change. I'm having trouble thinking of a good example for "comparison", but "change" could be, e.g., 我冷了.
Aug
12
comment “Are you still married to Mary?” How to translate this?
@DanielCheung Your edit is a good example of the "effort" we expect, e.g., "Here are some translations I found, but I think they're wrong because X". Anyone can just say that they looked but haven't found an acceptable translation, but our policy is that the content of your question demonstrates that prior effort. Here's one community member's stance on meta (there's more commentary on meta). There are many (mostly closed) questions here that just ask for a translation, and it would be a waste of the community's time to answer them.
Aug
7
comment What does 了 mean in this sentence?
@user3019766 吃汉堡 could be used to describe something one does habitually or a general statement, such as "我很喜欢吃汉堡" (an imperfective sentence). Also, perfective can be applied to actions that have not happened yet, e.g., "你吃完了以后,给我打电话".
Aug
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
6
comment 韵/声 Dictionary Organization: Why?
@user3306356 I do find that kind of surprising.
Aug
6
answered 韵/声 Dictionary Organization: Why?
Aug
4
comment The meaning of a Chinese inscription found under a little sculpture
A hand-drawn copy of a seal is definitely the most original form of "research effort" I've seen in a translation request. :)
Aug
2
comment Which dialect of Chinese has the fewest tones?
@wpt There are 5 different phonetic realizations, but in all but one case, you can predict which one to use entirely on the basis of the voicing of the initial and whether there's a final stop. So there's only a 2-way distinction that phonemic--阴平 vs everything else.
Jul
28
answered Mandarin Neutral Tone: Tone Value?
Jul
25
comment What is the difference between 好多 vs. 很多?
Humorous example of how interchangeable 好 is for 很: 你好坏哦!
Jul
23
comment Etymologically Correct Character For The Sichuanese ‘niang’ Meaning “What”
@S.Rhee It'd be nice to have IPA for it. Given that 四川話 is famous for it's n-l merger, it's hard to know whether it's phonetically an [l] or an [n] from that.
Jul
23
comment Etymologically Correct Character For The Sichuanese ‘niang’ Meaning “What”
@S.Rhee Do we know how that's actually pronounced? I presume that 啷 is another phonetic rendering (like 娘), so this might support my answer.
Jul
23
comment Character 瞓: where did the pronunciations come from?
@無色受想行識 I'd also like to see Claw's response to your question. However, I think you're using an incorrect definition of "regular sound change". "Regular" doesn't mean "unconditional"; your proposal that "certain vowels and finals conditioned the sound change" is an example of regular sound change.
Jul
23
comment Character: “Kei” For “To Go” (去) In Sichuanese
@Claw Just curious: was there a pattern to which remained and which became h?
Jul
23
comment What is the origin of the word 雪茄 (cigar)?
Welcome to Chinese Stack Exchange; have an upvote! In the future (once you pass 15 points), you can comment on other people's posts. This answer is somewhat slim and might do better as either a comment on or an edit to the other answer that indirectly suggests that 雪茄 entered via Wu. Alternately, you could expand your answer (e.g., with similar background to the other one along with sourced transcriptions of 雪茄 into some Wu dialect).
Jul
23
answered Etymologically Correct Character For The Sichuanese ‘niang’ Meaning “What”
Jul
23
comment Etymologically Correct Character For The Sichuanese ‘niang’ Meaning “What”
Not an answer, but a suggested resource: The 方言词汇 is a spectacular book, including surveys of common vocab across many dialects, using etymologically correct character choices (or commenting when one is not easily available). For example, 东西 will be listed in the various 吴 dialects as 物事, along with a pronunciation (~meh zy), rather than picking characters that sound like the pronunciation (e.g., 么子).
Jul
13
revised Different kinds of writing paper
Formatting (pinyin w/tone marks + characters)