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Feb
22
comment What is “Nordic hamstring curl” in Chinese?
My initial reaction to the title was "What is 'Nordic hamstring curl' in English?" :)
Jan
28
comment Help with pronouncing 道 precisely
Related: chinese.stackexchange.com/questions/16959/… tl;dr: If you pronounced pinyin "d" as /d/, you will not be misunderstood, even though it should be /t/.
Jan
18
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
14
answered b and p, d and t, k and g etc. in English and Cantonese
Jan
3
comment Information about the Nantong dialect
I agree with @Stan.
Jan
3
reviewed Leave Open Information about the Nantong dialect
Oct
30
comment Does Cantonese or Mandarin contain the voiced or voiceless velar fricative?
@user58955 In that sentence, yes. To paraphrase, "you'd be fine saying it any of these ways, but I would describe native speakers as producing uvular voiceless fricatives." Although, TBH, it's probably velar or uvular depending on the vowel.
Oct
30
comment Does Cantonese or Mandarin contain the voiced or voiceless velar fricative?
Dr. Branner, welcome to Chinese StackExchange. Here, have an upvote!
Oct
30
comment Does Cantonese or Mandarin contain the voiced or voiceless velar fricative?
@user58955 Hence my description "could pronounce... without impeding understanding" as opposed to "the way native speakers pronounce it".
Oct
29
answered Does Cantonese or Mandarin contain the voiced or voiceless velar fricative?
Sep
29
comment Do the notations ⅃⅃⅃ ___ LLL mean anything?
Good answer! :)
Sep
28
comment Does /Ĩ/ *really* exist in Southwestern Mandarin?
Ok, I think they're just using that weird letter to stand for "the single phoneme realized as [n] or [l]".
Sep
28
comment Does /Ĩ/ *really* exist in Southwestern Mandarin?
Does the resource also have initial n, or is it just using that to stand in for "could be realized as n or l depending on vowel".
Sep
28
comment Chinese characters by sound similarity
Well, based on what you have said, I'd focus on the aspirated/unaspirated distinction. For instance b vs p, d vs t, zh vs ch, j vs q, etc. This seems to be a common problem for Europeans whose native lang. only distinguishes voicing. Also, sounds that are difficult for many foreigners in my exp. include the zh/ch/sh vs j/q/x, r, u vs ü, (z/c/s)i vs (z/c/s)e, and tones in general.
Sep
22
comment Chinese characters by sound similarity
Characters aren't really relevant to this. You should learn pinyin (or another transcription system). Then practice distinguishing cononants that are difficult for you. Based on the examples you gave, I don't think you'll find the kind of resource you want. After all, Chinese people don't have difficulty distinguishing zh/ch/ch/j/q/x. Also for learners, what's difficult for you is different than someone with a different native language. E.g., zh and sh have always sounded completely different to me.
Aug
21
reviewed Leave Open English slang translation
Aug
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
16
comment When should I use “很” before an adjective?
I don't have time to write a proper answer, but the short version is that 很 is the default in these "X is Adj" sentences. If you use a different modifier (e.g., 非常), then it is in place of 很 (e.g., 我非常好). It's grammatically acceptable to drop 很, but it implies a comparison or change. I'm having trouble thinking of a good example for "comparison", but "change" could be, e.g., 我冷了.
Aug
12
comment “Are you still married to Mary?” How to translate this?
@DanielCheung Your edit is a good example of the "effort" we expect, e.g., "Here are some translations I found, but I think they're wrong because X". Anyone can just say that they looked but haven't found an acceptable translation, but our policy is that the content of your question demonstrates that prior effort. Here's one community member's stance on meta (there's more commentary on meta). There are many (mostly closed) questions here that just ask for a translation, and it would be a waste of the community's time to answer them.