2,856 reputation
718
bio website peterthenelson.com
location United States
age 26
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen 18 hours ago

I lived in China for a couple years. My Chinese isn't too bad, but I'm always trying to get better. Special interests in:

  • Etymology
  • Historical phonology
  • Winning arguments in other languages

Jun
19
revised Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
Addendum w/more detailed analysis of one character
Jun
19
comment Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
@fredsbend I wrote "yan3" and "lin2" because they are phonetic components. They have f*** all to do with the meaning of the whole character. I will add an analysis for garden.
Jun
18
comment Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
@MikeManilone I mean "most" both in the context of the article as well as in the sense "most of the characters listed in a dictionary". Also, although phonetics are occasionally semanticly relevant, it's a mistake to think that they must contribute to the character's meaning. Sometimes a phonetic is just a phonetic :)
Jun
18
comment Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
@Stan Exactly what editing is for.
Jun
18
awarded  Yearling
Jun
18
comment Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
@CongXu Good enough for me! Updated :)
Jun
18
revised Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
updated one explanation
Jun
18
comment Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
@CongXu I was basing my analysis off of that offered at chineseetymology.org. I had also originally assumed it was 告 as the phonetic, but I'd need more information to make a clear determination (e.g., middle chinese pronunciation). Any resources?
Jun
18
answered Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
Jun
18
comment Can someone verify the meaning and age of these ancient Chinese characters?
What is the actual question? Yes, the oracle bone script existed. Many of the characters are still in use, although obviously with wildly different pronunciations, graphical forms, and meanings.
Jun
6
comment Can whether a character is simplified or traditional depend on the context it is used in?
Great summary of simplification. I think the OP is not asking whether you use a simplified vs tradition based on context but whether a given character is called "traditional" or "simplified" based on context.
Jun
6
revised Can whether a character is simplified or traditional depend on the context it is used in?
Fixed union vs intersection
Jun
6
comment Can whether a character is simplified or traditional depend on the context it is used in?
@Stan That's what edits are for! I'll fix it.
Jun
6
answered Can whether a character is simplified or traditional depend on the context it is used in?
Jun
6
comment What is the difference between 們 and 们 for marking plurals?
I'd also like to point out that 门/們 is not a generic plural marker. It's used mostly for pronouns (我 vs 我们), and it has very limited use beyond that (The only other use I can think of: it can be added to nouns when a speaker is a addressing an audience, indicating mutual inclusion in that group, e.g, Hu Jintao addressing the audience beginning with "同志们,朋友们" = "Comrades, friends, ...")
Jun
4
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Can I use a rare character like 飂 in a name?
Jun
4
comment Can I use a rare character like 飂 in a name?
@Stan I am aware that the surname is pronounced qiu2. I said "chou zhaoting" because this a mispronunciation that other Chinese people have made when reading her name.
Jun
4
comment Can I use a rare character like 飂 in a name?
@Stan I think it's because it looks similar to other, more common characters (e.g., 照 and 熙).
Jun
4
comment Can I use a rare character like 飂 in a name?
My friend is named 仇煦婷. She has this problem too :( "oh hey, chou zhaoting, what's up?"
May
31
comment Was there ever a “Xijing?” Could it have been “Xi An?”
@Stan I said there isn't any city officially named 西京, not there has never been one.