3,063 reputation
820
bio website peterthenelson.com
location United States
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 5 hours ago

I lived in China for a couple years. My Chinese isn't too bad, but I'm always trying to get better. Special interests in:

  • Etymology
  • Historical phonology
  • Winning arguments in other languages

Jun
4
comment Can I use a rare character like 飂 in a name?
@Stan I am aware that the surname is pronounced qiu2. I said "chou zhaoting" because this a mispronunciation that other Chinese people have made when reading her name.
Jun
4
comment Can I use a rare character like 飂 in a name?
@Stan I think it's because it looks similar to other, more common characters (e.g., 照 and 熙).
Jun
4
comment Can I use a rare character like 飂 in a name?
My friend is named 仇煦婷. She has this problem too :( "oh hey, chou zhaoting, what's up?"
May
31
comment Was there ever a “Xijing?” Could it have been “Xi An?”
@Stan I said there isn't any city officially named 西京, not there has never been one.
May
31
answered Was there ever a “Xijing?” Could it have been “Xi An?”
May
29
comment What is 被 doing in sentence “这种病在三十年前就被根除了”?
@drHannibalLecter Point taken. Just saying, this is, I think, a normal example of the passive voice.
May
29
comment What is 被 doing in sentence “这种病在三十年前就被根除了”?
@drHannibalLecter Why is "to be eradicated" being in the passive confusing at all? I appreciate learning about different classes of verbs and all, but this seems like a really simple case of passive. 被V = to be Ved
May
28
comment What does 亮黄灯了 mean?
@deutschZuid Where is the web snippet??
May
28
comment What does 亮黄灯了 mean?
@deutschZuid In my experience (US), we say "Yellow light".
May
28
comment Semantic radical and dictionary header for 将
@Stan I say that etymology doesn't really matter (to the question of what the 部首 is) because that's a factual question about how dictionaries are organized. The dictionary organizers could be terribly mistaken about the etymology, and it would still be true that dictionaries are organized that way. Great answer by the way.
May
28
comment Semantic radical and dictionary header for 将
If we take the quoted text at face value, it would seem that it really is a 会意字 and doesn't have a phonetic component. I think the question of what 部首 it should be listed under in a dictionary is a separate question--I'm sure there's a "right" answer for modern PRC dictionaries, but that doesn't necessarily say anything about the etymology.
May
26
comment Is there a Chinese equivalent of the German “Mut zur Lücke”?
FYI, "courage to have a gap" doesn't make sense in English, so searching for a translation of "knowledge gap" might not be helpful.
May
23
comment What does it say on the stamp?
@QuestionOverflow Put it in an answer, you might get 100 points :)
May
21
comment How to say properly translate “circulation”?
In the first example, is that any different from, say, a ceiling fan? I'm not familiar with the term "circulation fan", although it's easy to imagine what it means.
May
20
comment Did a king ask for a ball? How did 王 + 求 become 球?
Brilliant answer.
May
15
comment How is pronunciation discussed in Chinese?
@孤影萍踪 天(tiān), 跹(xiān), and 圆(yuán) do all end in [ɛn], while 山(shān) and 关(guān) do not. The rhyming rules for classical chinese poetry are complex and do not have much to do with Mandarin pronunciation. See this for a lengthy exposition of rhyming rules in Classical Chinese poetry.
May
15
comment How is pronunciation discussed in Chinese?
@NS.X. It's entirely possible you both perceive them as rhyming; but that would be a product of your "feeling" for Chinese phonology. If you were a foreign language learner, it would not be helpful to think of 煙 as being 一 + 安.
May
15
comment How is pronunciation discussed in Chinese?
@孤影萍踪 "An" is pronounced [an], while "yan" (or the "ian" in words starting with consonants) is pronounced [jɛn]. They're both spelled the same, and it's entirely possible you perceive them the same, but the vowels are different (e.g., pot = [pat], pet = [pɛt])
May
14
comment How is pronunciation discussed in Chinese?
How do you know what a "K" sound is? Is that any more illuminating than saying that "cow" starts with the same sound as "kid"? Also, I disagree with your casual switch from "Learner" to "children". Learners of a foreign language need to be taught how to pronounce things. Children generally don't.
May
14
comment How is pronunciation discussed in Chinese?
I find it somewhat humorous to see broken down as 七-衣-安 because the "an" in doesn't even rhyme with the "an" in 浅. Of course, the point still stands that you can indicate initials and finals by comparison with other characters.