3,060 reputation
820
bio website peterthenelson.com
location United States
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 2 days ago

I lived in China for a couple years. My Chinese isn't too bad, but I'm always trying to get better. Special interests in:

  • Etymology
  • Historical phonology
  • Winning arguments in other languages

Oct
27
comment How to parse this phrase?
Well, has a standalone reading of "chang4", and so far as I can tell, there are only about 4 characters that contain it as a component (e.g., ). I think if you were trying to communicate with a chinese person, you'd need an explanation that was long than a word (e.g., when describing a character, bring up --preferably by making reference to a compound it's found in--, then describe the rest of the character).
Oct
27
comment How to parse this phrase?
Not off the top of my head. Most of the radicals and components are the same anyway, although their form might be somewhat different.
Oct
27
answered How to parse this phrase?
Oct
26
awarded  Civic Duty
Oct
25
answered Is there more than one way to pronounce “knee” in Chinese?
Oct
24
comment How to write 400,002,000 in Chinese properly?
Yeah, but in the north, that sounds totally 二! :-)
Oct
23
answered problem with 要 - it seems to have several meanings
Oct
22
comment What shoud I use to say “I love you”: “wa ai lo” or “wo ai ni”?
@Derek “粤”包括广东话
Oct
21
comment Dog radical (犭) for non-Han ethnic groups
For example, calling the Zhuang people the . The character picked sounds something like what the Zhuang people call themselves, and it has negative connotations. Hence the later move to change it.
Oct
21
comment Dog radical (犭) for non-Han ethnic groups
Initially I thought you were wrong. After thinking it through, I think you were just a little unclear. Bit more explicit would be A well bred dog (good result of careful breeding) => A well trained dog => Result similar to intended result => similar to. I agree totally with your assertions that 犹太 is a transliteration for יהודים (Yehudim) and that the use of was neither intended to be derogatory, nor it is likely to be taken as such. However, I would like to point out many old names for other ethnic groups are derogatory and transliterations at the same time. [cont]
Oct
21
comment Dog radical (犭) for non-Han ethnic groups
I agree with Kang. The radical is a dog. That doesn't mean that the modern meanings of have anything to do with dogs, but to say "犭has nothing to do with dogs" is misleading at best.
Oct
21
comment Dog radical (犭) for non-Han ethnic groups
The etymology of is like this. It originally had to do with breeding and training dogs:本义:经过远景规划和长期选育得到的良犬。转义:与选育设想和目标大体符合的犬崽。转义的引申:如同,相似. It's only the modern meanings that have nothing to do with dogs.
Oct
19
comment Difference between 接受 and 接收
Haven't seen any of the other edits, but "the army rejected him as unfit" is perfectly idiomatic English to describe someone not being accepted into the military.
Oct
14
comment Why do Chinese translations of English names sound very inaccurate?
@MikeManilone That's interesting. What I was saying though, was that presumably they were targeting the German pronunciation. Because in English, John has a [dʒ] and not a [j], so "yue" and "yo" all sound bad.
Oct
12
comment Grammar for counting in Chinese (for non-native speakers of Chinese)
Oh, totally forgot! Some words don't take classifiers, but there are very few of them. and are the only ones I can think of off the top of my head.
Oct
12
comment Grammar for counting in Chinese (for non-native speakers of Chinese)
@xiaohouzi79 1. As part of the algorithm I provided, you should use whatever classifier is listed in the dictionary (if available), not all the time. 2. If you can't find a classifier, using is waayyy better than using nothing. For one, without a classifier, it's syntactically invalid. With one, at worst it's awkward or ugly. Also, the words which are most likely to lack a classifier in their entry are words where would be more likely to be appropriate.
Oct
11
comment Grammar for counting in Chinese (for non-native speakers of Chinese)
My suggested algorithm: 1. Find nouns (assume you can do this, or that it is provided). 2. Look up the classifier for the noun (you can scrape a dictionary site for entries on all your nouns). If multiple classifiers, pick one. If no classifier available, use 个. 3. Insert <number><classifier> before the noun. 4. As to the preferable form of the number, I'd do something easy, like chinese numerals for n < 20 (and remembering 2 = 两) and arabic numerals for n >= 20.
Oct
11
comment Grammar for counting in Chinese (for non-native speakers of Chinese)
@xiaohouzi79 Keep in mind that the question is about having a computer program insert numbers and classifiers before nouns. The asker has stated pretty explicitly they don't know and aren't really learning chinese (at least in the context of this project). It's really about coming up with an algorithm that's tractable and "good enough".
Oct
11
comment Grammar for counting in Chinese (for non-native speakers of Chinese)
My suggested algorithm: 1. Find nouns (assume you can do this, or that it is provided). 2. Look up the classifier for the noun (you can scrape a dictionary site for entries on all your nouns). If multiple classifiers, pick one. If no classifier available, use 个. 3. Insert <number><classifier> before the noun. 4. As to the preferable form of the number, I'd do something easy, like chinese numerals for n < 20 (and remembering 2 = 两) and arabic numerals for n >= 20.
Oct
9
comment What is 德国 and naming history in China?
This is wrong. Almost all of these are 音译, and they have nothing to do with the meaning of the characters. The exception in your list would of course be 中国, which actually does mean "middle country" (often translated as "middle kingdom").