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bio website google.com
location Sin City (no, not Las Vegas)
age 42
visits member for 2 years
seen 16 hours ago

Feb
27
comment Why do people often say 最多 in Cantonese when they mean “at the very least”?
Not just Cantonese. This is applicable to Mandarin too.
Feb
27
comment 筛选 is the correct filter for 'search filter'?
Yes, that's right.
Feb
26
comment What does 算你狠 mean?
@hippietrail, I disagree. From the question, OP already knows what it means and is seeking for the "best wording". If she really wants, she can always post in EL&U asking how to express "you win", but with the emotion "you only win because you over-do it brutally". In Chinese with have this expression 算你狠... CL&U users shouldn't be inundated with English word/phrase/slang requests from users whose only purpose is to improve their English vocabulary.
Feb
25
comment Difference between 坏 and 破
What I am trying to say is that there is no one-one mapping for languages. Neither is 破 used on a broken phone unless it is literally broken (into pieces).
Feb
25
comment Difference between 坏 and 破
It means the tv is spoilt (broke down). 腿坏了 doesn't mean a broken leg (腿断了 does).
Feb
25
comment Difference between 坏 and 破
I don't know where you get the translated meanings. But try understand the meanings using a Chinese dictionary and use the English one only as a reference. means bad or spoilt, not broken. But in English, anything that is broken is spoilt.
Feb
19
comment Why does 拉倒 mean “forget about it”?
I think 拉倒 is used as a figure of speech to imply bringing down something that you have put up earlier. It is usually spoken when you want to conditionally rescind an offer.
Feb
17
comment Confusion about bian 邊 and miàn 面
@Stan, in cases where there is overlap, I agree there could be some regional preference. But, I don't see how 镜子前边 is proper Chinese. You may like to provide your own answer if you are adamant about it :)
Feb
17
comment Confusion about bian 邊 and miàn 面
@Stan, based on my own experience, I have never heard anyone say 镜子前边. Neither have I heard of 书包里边. As such, I disagree that they are equal regardless of what is prescribed in 《现代汉语词典》. Although there are cases where the usage of 面 overlap with 边, we should learn to distinguish them for the sake of clarity.
Feb
15
comment What does 算你狠 mean?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about English. Chinese SE caters for people learning the Chinese Language. It is never a site for people to learn English.
Feb
9
comment list of Chinese language country name abbreviations
Have you tried Wikipedia?
Feb
9
comment Is 師奶 (see lai) strictly a Cantonese word? Is it a neutral word or does it have a negative connotation?
I know 師奶杀手 (auntie-killer) refers to a man who attracts older women with his boyish charm.
Feb
3
comment Zhuyin IME and tone 0/5 syllables
@hippietrail, it really depends on the IME you are using. Those that do not allow you to enter tones would need to have the predictive text ability turn on.
Feb
3
comment Is there a tone sandhi rule that “4 3” changes to “4 0”?
Changes of morphemes in Mandarin to the neutral tone are not examples of tone sandhi.
Feb
2
comment Zhuyin IME and tone 0/5 syllables
I believe most IMEs work like this, whether using pinyin or zhuyin. This is also how you would look up a word in the dictionary based on the pinyin or zhuyin of individual characters.
Jan
31
comment “A pair of mandarin oranges” as a homophone of “the gold”
It is due to the colour more than anything else.
Jan
30
comment Does anyone recognize the characters written on this home shrine?
忠義 is read from RTL and the story of the three brothers.
Jan
30
comment When to use “下一个” and when just “下一” to translate English “next”?
Yes, definitely.
Jan
30
comment When to use “下一个” and when just “下一” to translate English “next”?
下[一]个 means next one (down the list). 上[一]个 means previous one (up the list). 一 or 一个 does not contain any meaning of next or previous.
Jan
19
comment Origin of 乎 as a bound morpheme in words such as 热乎
Never heard of these "热乎,温乎,確乎,玄乎,忙乎,晕乎". Where do you find those words?