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Jan
10
comment Characters which have several different shapes
@景洛弘 Huang's comment above your answers the question: I can ignore stylistic differences safely. This is not true if you're learning the Roman alphabet: both forms g (gg) are commonly used, and need to be learned.
Jan
10
awarded  Commentator
Jan
10
comment Characters which have several different shapes
Re point 3., I mean the first image, not the second. I was wondering if this is regularly encountered when say, you're reading a newspaper in China, or can I safely ignore them and assume that I'll only see the standard variants if my computer is configures correctly and I don't start studying Japanese :-)
Jan
10
asked Searching for characters by parts
Jan
10
comment Characters which have several different shapes
@景洛弘 Also note that I have already adjusted both my operating system (WinXP) and my browser to prefer Chinese fonts over Japanese for CJK glyphs, so it's not a technical problem for me. It's a not a technical question, it's simply about why these variants exist, and how they affect me as a learner. See the three explicit questions in the second section of my post.
Jan
10
comment Characters which have several different shapes
@景洛弘 This question is not about the browser (also, this is not a bug, what if I were learning Japanese?). This question is about why there are several shapes for these characters, are all these shapes used in China too, or some are Japanese-only, etc. In Traditional Chinese fonts I sometimes see the same variant of 直 as in Japanese fonts, so this must be used in Chinese too ...
Jan
10
revised Characters which have several different shapes
edited title
Jan
10
revised Is there a Chinese WordNet?
added 84 characters in body
Jan
10
asked Is there a Chinese WordNet?
Jan
10
asked Characters which have several different shapes
Jan
2
revised Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)
added 73 characters in body
Jan
2
revised Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)
added 90 characters in body
Dec
28
comment Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)
Yes, you are right that this question isn't different from an analogous question for English, and it is s complex one, yet there are many etymological dictionaries for English giving this kind of information. (I'd point you to the OED, but unfortunately it's not freely accessible unless you happen to be at a university that is subscribed). Languages can be and are sometimes heavily influenced by the writing system, but we must not forget that the writing system is not the same as the language, and the language was there before the writing.
Dec
22
comment Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)
Take the concrete example I mentioned: how could I find out if 牦牛 has anything to do with 毛牛? Checking what those things are called in some other Chinese languages (especially those spoken at places where 牦牛 actually live and are domesticated) would be interesting, but usually the most I can get is the pronunciations assigned to written character in Mandarin and maybe Cantonese, but that's all.
Dec
22
comment Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)
For this question, I am interested in the history of spoken words, not the writing system. Why a certain thing is called what it's called, and not why a certain logogram is drawn the way it's drawn. Most of the time when I ask questions like this I hit a wall where people apparently insist of implicitly interpreting "Chinese" as "Chinese written using Chinese characters", so here I excplitily clarified this. Chinese was spoken even before Chinese characters existed, right?
Dec
22
awarded  Supporter
Dec
22
awarded  Student
Dec
22
awarded  Editor
Dec
22
revised Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)
edited title
Dec
22
asked Are there any online etymological dictionaries of Mandarin (not for characters but for spoken words)