3

I often eat this as part of my lunch:

Is this "mantou"?

Question: Is this still mántóu (馒头) or should I call it something else?

So far I've called this mantou without any real issues, but it seems different to the usual mantou (which have a smooth surface).

  • 1
    This is 花卷, huā juǎn. – Stan Aug 17 '15 at 12:15
5

The Chinese mostly call it "花卷" in daily life but you might regard it as a variant of "馒头" as well, if you apply the concept of "馒头" broadly. It's just that it more usually comes with some flavoring compared with 馒头 which can be plain. Apparently there's a Wikipedia entry for it https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandarin_roll

  • The first time I tried this, I went in and proudly asked for 花卷, I had to say it three times before they understood. I guess they were expecting me to say 馒头. giggles – Becky 李蓓 Aug 23 '15 at 2:03
  • @RebeccaJ.Stones Haha sure. I think an analogy would be like in Spanish-speaking countries you can say "pasta" and they'll all understand, but there are actually a lot of variety of pasta, like gnocchi, corbata, spaghetti etc. – xji Aug 23 '15 at 7:53
1

Stones~ This is huā juǎn(花卷),not mántóu (馒头).

There is a website teach your how to make huā juǎn.You may DIY if you have time~

http://thewoksoflife.com/2014/03/chinese-scallion-rolls/

0

这是花卷,不是馒头。

https://www.google.com/search?q=花卷&hl=en&tbm=isch

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