1

The final ue can be found in some Chinese dialects/topolects. It seems to also be written properly as if I'm not mistaken.

The Wikipedia page for Sichuanese Mandarin lists an example:

ue

Which I would understand could be written, in full, as gue without any sort of tone markings.

Does ue/ just equate to pinyin ue?

  • 2
    Different pinyin systems are not mutually compatible, but more a collection of similar schemes. Mandarin pinyin ue [y̯ø] is not the same as Sichuanese pinyin ue [uɛ], as the IPA suggests. – user4452 Nov 20 '15 at 18:04
  • @倪阔乐 Isn't Mandarin's ue [y̯ø] not technically -üe [y̯ø] (as wiki mentions), like ü [y] after j, q, x, or y where it is just simply written as u because there is no u [u] sound to be mixed up with. – user3306356 Nov 21 '15 at 6:17
  • You should clarify by pinyin do you mean Mandarin pinyin or Sichuan pinyin. – NS.X. Apr 26 '16 at 16:56
2

Hanyu Pinyin is generally used for Standard Chinese. If you want to represent /uɛ/ in something consistent with Hanyu Pinyin, you could use . The Wikipedia article was using Sichuanese Pinyin, which may not be compatible with Hanyu Pinyin.

  • I'm just concerned about that the diacritic above the e (ê) will be misconstrued as a tonality marker. – user3306356 Apr 26 '16 at 5:30
  • It could be, but according to Hanyu Pinyin, ê does represent /ɛ/. Then the same would go for the umlaut on ü, which represents /y/. – justinrleung Apr 26 '16 at 5:56
  • Hokkienese fifth tone (陽平) uses ^ as its tone marker. /y/ for instance in Mandarin is only ü in certain places but u in others like yu 玉. – user3306356 Apr 26 '16 at 6:17
  • I see what you mean, but POJ or Tâi-lô is quite incompatible with Pinyin. Also, ê is also used in the Hakka romanization scheme (Guangdong Dept of Education) for /ɛ/. – justinrleung Apr 28 '16 at 23:18
0

ue and üe are pronounced differently.

ue is not used in Mandarin. Only üe is used.


Edit:

The questioner was actually asking about using Hanyu Pinyin to transcribe Sichuanese. Hanyu Pinyin was designed as a tool to teach the speaking of mandarin, but it is still possible to capture words in Sichuanese using the closest possible combinations. I see no problem with doing so since this is probably the best you can get. But since it is still an approximation, if you stick to it methodologically your pronunciation will sound a little off to native speakers.

  • @user3306356 Sorry could you please elaborate your question a little more? I thought you were asking whether or not "ue" in Sichuanese Mandarin equates "ue" in Mandarin. But "ue" is simply not used in Mandarin, hence my answer. – Cosmos Gu Apr 23 '16 at 8:01
  • I'm not bothered about mandarin, I'm just asking if “ue” would be acceptable as Sichuanese pinyin. – user3306356 Apr 26 '16 at 5:31
  • @user3306356 I see. Hanyu Pinyin was designed as a tool to teach the speaking of mandarin. It is possible to capture words in Sichuanese using the closest possible combinations, but it is still an approximation. I see no problem with using Hanyu Pinyin to transcribe Sichuanese since this is probably the best you can get. But if you stick to it methodologically, your pronunciation will sound a little off to native speakers. – Cosmos Gu Apr 26 '16 at 6:26
  • @user3306356 I edited my answer to address your actual question (the same thing I said in my comment, albeit rephrased). – Cosmos Gu Apr 26 '16 at 6:33

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