1

Is this 得 doing the same job in both sentences? Maybe in 2. they should have used 地? (I don't really think so, but maybe.)

  1. 把自己梳理得漂亮而迷人。
  2. 会不会忧郁得生病?

In 1. I have 得[漂亮]而[迷人] [形容词] In 2. I have 得(生病) (动词)

忧郁: sullen, depressed

3

Is this 得 doing the same job in both sentences?

Yes. Both 得 are 'verb particle'

In both sentences, 得 are following a verb. It is a [verb particle] of the verb before it.

'漂亮而迷人' is the 'result/ degree' of the action '把自己梳理'

[把自己梳理] is the [verb phrase]; [得] is a [verb particle] (*used to express possibility or capability; to indicate the result or degree. Similar to English 'to' / 'to the point of' *)

[漂亮而迷人] here is an [adjective phrase]. It is the[result/degree] of the verb phrase [把自己梳理].

~

'生病' is the result/ degree of '忧郁'

[忧郁] is the main verb; [得] is a [verb particle] (*used to express possibility or capability; to indicate the result or degree. Similar to English 'to' / 'to the point of' *)

[生病] is the auxiliary verb. It is the [result/degree] caused by the main verb [忧郁].

2
  • 忧郁 is a 动词? That was my problem. I thought it is a 形容词 and 生病 is a 动词。 Could you give me a sentence with 忧郁 very clearly a 动词? Could I use it instead of say: 使沮丧,使伤心?
    – Pedroski
    Mar 17 '17 at 0:53
  • Even if 得 is following an adjective, it is still a verb particle because the verb "being" was just being omitted. " (being) sad to the point of getting sick"
    – Tang Ho
    Mar 17 '17 at 2:39
1

(clause A)得(clause B) is a general grammar in Chinese.

There must be clause A before 得 and clause B after it.

Clause B is the extent or degree used to describe clause A. It can be verbs or adjectives, doesn't matter at all.

Example: 忧郁得生病。 => Depressed to the extent of being sick.

Example: 做得好。 => Doing to the extent of being good. => Well done.

It can be understood, too, that 得 is used to convert a clause to adverb form.

Clause A: 裝饰 <==> decorate (verb)
Clause B: 很漂亮 <==> Very beautiful (adjective)

Whole sentence: 裝饰得很漂亮。=> Very beautifully (adverb) decorated.

地 is put after a single word, probably adjective to be an adverb. It is a different grammar.

Ex: 忙碌地 => busily

3
  • If I write 1. 会严重地生病 2. 会严重得生病 which do you prefer? I think 2. is not good Chinese.
    – Pedroski
    Mar 17 '17 at 23:11
  • The two sentences are of different meaning, if you look detailed into my post. 1. Will be Seriously sick 2. Will be serious that I'll be sick. Mar 18 '17 at 1:22
  • @Pedrosky, 1. means ' makes really bad sick', 2. means '(something really bad and) makes sick'.
    – wolfrevo
    Mar 20 '17 at 5:17
1

Simple pattern:

adj + 的 + noun
adv + 地 + verb
verb + 得 + adv
  1. 把自己梳理得漂亮而迷人。

梳理(verb) 漂亮(acting like a adverb)

  1. 会不会忧郁得生病?

忧郁(acting like verb), 生病(acting like adverb)

2
  • So what you are saying is: de makes the difference? In spoken language you cannot hear the difference. You do not know which de. 我忧郁了。我好了。 Is 好 a verb?
    – Pedroski
    Mar 19 '17 at 23:31
  • @Pedroski, In spoken language, we need to use contexts to figure out 'de'. In high quality writings, these characters have strong different functions, can not be interchangeble. You can prove it in newspapers, dictionaries.
    – wolfrevo
    Mar 20 '17 at 5:05
-1

i know this forum today,so i sign up a account and learn english instead, fo me , i thinks chinese grammar is stanger, because, for us, i need not any grammar, so i think every sentence, i noly use "的" is ok, because, i never use "得 地" for a long time

1
  • I can't just go around only using 的, I would get into trouble! I have exams to pass!
    – Pedroski
    Mar 17 '17 at 0:55

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