1

I teach English online to children in China. One of my students has autism and cannot answer many questions. When I ask him what his name is, he always says "My name is Drumpou (or Trumpou)," which is not his name. He is trying to communicate something but I don't know what it is.

  • Thank you for your ideas. It does sound like Trump. He is autistic, as I mentioned, but he could be making a political joke. – Judith Burnell May 2 '17 at 22:28
1

Trump sounds like Trump. Many Chinese speakers whose English is not so hot will say 'ah' or 'oh' after English words, like: goodah, coldah.

This is the character for 啊 a, this is 哦 o. They are often added at the end of sentences for reasons of prosody.

You can say: 对 dui, meaning 'correct', but mostly you will hear 对阿 dui a 'correct'

Maybe he is making a (political) joke:
What's your name?
Trumpoh!

  • The official Chinese version of Donald Trump's last name is 特朗普 (te-lang-pu), so it has a "u" sound at the end. He might mean it as a joke, or he may just think of it as an English name that sounds good. – KWeiss May 11 '17 at 6:59
  • Although I believe this is the most correct answer. But I want to clarify that, adding "ah" or "oh" after English words is totally not the same situation with adding 啊 after 对. The reason for the former one is that Chinese speakers tend to have a vowel in every syllable, and only /n/, /ŋ/ can appear after the vowel. Therefore, a syllable like /trʌmp/ is not valid in the eye of Chinese. They would tend to say /'ʨuanpɤ/ so that it feels more natural for them. As for 对 vs 对啊, it's not a phonetic thing, but pragmatics. – Harry Summer May 13 '17 at 9:47
-1

Maybe it is his 乳名. Parents call their child using such 'nickname'. Kids aren't really aware that, whether to give their real-name or nickname to other to name him/her, sometimes.

It is just a guess. You may better consult his parent to reveal.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.