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Is there anybody who can help me, please?..

I have studied that in this setence: "Zhongguo de youpiao" zhongguo characterizes youpiao e that's why we use the particle "de", but I found this sentence: "Zhongguo cha" where the word Zhongguo seems to characterize the word "cha", so why don't we use the particle "de" in this case?

非常感谢你的帮助!

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Most 的 in the "attribute+的+headword" structure like 中国的邮票 can be omitted, except when the attribute is a superlative adjective or the modifier is too long. You have to refer to the context whether to omit it or not.

  • Thank you so much for your help once againg. I'd be glad to help you, you'll just have to forgive if I don't answer you right away sometimes, since I have a very busy life, besides studying chinese I teach. – Clara Fonseca May 15 '17 at 8:17
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It's the same case as Engligh right? We can also say in English: China Tea, or Chinese Tea. As long as omitting "de" does not introduce ambiguity, it's fine. However, it will sounds more like a proper noun instead of adj.+noun.

  • Thank you so much for your help! So when we ommit the "de" in this kind of situations it is like if the adjective becomes a noun. – Clara Fonseca May 12 '17 at 11:24
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it's happy that i can hele you to learn chinese,actually i m chinese,if i explain wrong with english grammar,hope you forgive me.ok,let's begin.in fact 'zhongguo cha' also mean 'zhongguo de cha',the first one is a abbreviation of'zhongguo de cha',the word 'de' in chinese means something belones somebody or something,or somebody do something using 'de' connect,for example:'shui faming le dengpao?' ,'Edison faming de.' --which in english means 'who create lights?','Edison create it'. and i want to make a friend who major in software,because i want ask question in stackoverflow,but my english is not well to organize my sentences to ask in a good way.so i help you learn chinese when i m free,and you help me change my question into a better english sentence.

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