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I've got this entry from 《广安方言与民俗词典》which goes as follows:

fei3

指呕吐。例:他中午吃醉酒了,fei3了一地。

□ is as Wiktionary states:

Used as a placeholder for an unknown hanzi.

There's a good chance though that this character word does have an actual representational character.

I've not been able to find any MSM fei readings that mean to throw up/to barf, etc.

Notes: fei3 is equivalent to [fei⁵³] - so almost the same as fei4 in MSM.

Any ideas on what it can be?


My leaning at the moment is that fei3 is actually a contraction (合音) of something like 发呕 or 发哕 - not that I have any proof for it but it seems to be the most likely at the moment.

  • Does《广安方言与民俗词典》have a radical lookup or something similar, such that you can back-reference the page number for which this entry appears? – droooze Feb 26 '18 at 9:03
  • @droooze They claim there is no character for this word. But, I'm thinking that there might be a fitting one that they haven't included. – user3306356 Feb 26 '18 at 9:04
  • Did you see this in an electronic version or paper book? – fefe Feb 27 '18 at 1:22
  • @fefe The paper edition is the same as the electronic version, I've checked both. There might not be an actual character at all, it is a topolect that we're talking about after all. Their editors obviously believe that there is no character, I'm proposing that there might in fact be a suitable character though, because often times there is. – user3306356 Feb 27 '18 at 1:33
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I'm thinking it could be a word similar to 淝 in Cantonese.

http://www.cantonese.sheik.co.uk/dictionary/characters/8979/


fe4 fei4 jyutping
fei2 pinyin
[粵] fe4 - Cantonese only
[1] [v] spray/sprinkle (water)
[2] [v] shoot; gun down
[粵] fei4 [國] fei2
[n] name of a river in Anhui province, famous in Chinese history for Battle of Fei River (AD 383)

Examples of usage:
淝到周圍都係
淝啲成身濕

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