1

My teacher wants me to write about Game of thrones in Chinese. I am facing the problem of accurately translating medieval titles into Chinese. For “squire” I found the translation:

鄉紳: Country gentleman; squire

Since that is a Chinese title, I am unsure, if squire is meant in the sense I intend - that is someone who was a page and is waiting on a Knight.

Analogously, I found

小廝: young male servant, page

書童: page boy

小么兒: page boy

But I am unsure whether any of these can be applied in the context of knighthood, as opposed to hotels.

4

For this kind of thing you can check out 91dict.com.

The subtitle group 人人影视字幕组 have complied a dictionary from their subtitle translations.

For instance if you look up squire under 基本释义 we get:

n. 乡绅;侍从;大地主;地方法官

vt. 随侍;护卫

n. (Squire)人名;(英)斯夸尔

and under 场景例句 there are example sentences from Game of Thrones including:

来自《冰与火之歌:权力的游戏 第4季 第3集》

There has never lived a more loyal squire.

世上从无你这般忠心的侍从

and

He was a squire until a few months ago.

他之前一直是侍从 数月前才受封

Seems like they really like 侍从 for squire.


For page they give:

男侍者

1

"鄉紳" are gentlemen in village, no military aspect

if you want some terms that "squire was typically a teenaged boy, training to become a knight", i would suggest:

"義勇", or "鄉勇"

http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000151550

http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000109962

1

Starting from English and trying to take over the sense:

squire 持盾者

early 13c., "young man who attends a knight," later "member of the landowning class ranking below a knight" (c. 1300), from Old French esquier "squire," literally "shield carrier"

农 场主 Meaning "country gentleman, landed proprietor" is from 1670s; as a general term of address to a gentleman, it is attested from 1828.

page 侍从, 侍从官

"youth, lad, boy of the lower orders," c. 1300, originally also "youth preparing to be a knight," from Old French page "a youth, page, servant" (13c.)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.