4

I came across a sandhi rule - described here (point number 6):

A 2nd tone preceded by a 1st or 2nd tone and followed by another tone becomes a 1st tone

I never heard of this rule before so I was wondering if it is well known. I found one other reference for it here: Is there a tone sandhi for 2nd-tone-2nd-tone names?, where it's described differently:

In a trisyllabic expression, if (a) the first syllable is T1 or T2, (b) the middle syllable is T2, and (c) the final syllable is not weak, then the middle T2 can change to T1 in conversational speed.

Is this rule commonly known? Is it commonly accepted? Are there any other references for it?

Thanks

  • In the accept answer of the question you referenced: "My own sense is that T2 Sandhi is not a productive or required rule. Instead, it is likely to be conditioned by the speed of speech (Shih 2005) and frequency of the expression." (quoted from San Duamu's work) – fefe May 11 '18 at 7:51
  • Yes, I saw that too. It seems the post (eastasiastudent.net/china/mandarin/tone-change-rules) is a bit too categorical. – goPlayerJuggler May 11 '18 at 8:12
  • I checked the 3 examples given in your first link, and I'm pretty sure I've never used such a rule even unconsciously, nor have i heard anyone use it. Those pronunciations are just weird for me. – Jason Swift May 11 '18 at 8:13
  • @goPlayerJuggler I really do not think the point 6 in your link about tone sandhi of 2nd tone is valid in Mandarin. – fefe May 11 '18 at 8:28
  • Thanks JasonSwift and fefe. It seems very much like the author of the first link was trying to describe a real phenomenon in spoken Chinese (i.e. the phenomenon described in the accepted answer of the referenced SE question) but made a few mistakes in the description. – goPlayerJuggler May 11 '18 at 9:51
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I asked the author of the blog eastasiastudent.net about it and he told me it was probably a mistake. Given the comments from @fefe and @JasonSwift, my conclusion is that the author of the first link was trying to describe a real phenomenon in spoken Chinese (i.e. the phenomenon described in the accepted answer of the referenced SE question) but made a few mistakes in the description.

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