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I'm a writer. I am trying to get "Forces of Evil, Come and Obey" or something with the same general meaning translated to phonetic Cantonese so I can have a character use it like a chant in a story intended for an English speaking audience.

Like 'Yu Mo Gui Gwai Fai Di Zao' is able to be chanted and understood by an American audience.

  • How would 'Yu Mo Gui Gwai Fai Di Zao' be able to be understood by an American audience? – user3306356 Feb 20 at 8:04
  • As individual syllables that they can repeat verbally. – The Amused Muse Feb 20 at 13:41
  • 'Yu Mo Gui Gwai Fai D Zao' sounds like "妖魔鬼怪快啲走" in Cantonese. It means "Evil demons and unholy ghost, hurry and be gone" – Tang Ho Feb 20 at 17:00
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Chinese slogans typically come in idiomatic (four characters) phrase

if "Forces of Evil, Come and Obey" means "we are the forces of Evil, come and obey us" then I suggest:

"道消魔長,順我者昌"

"(the power of) good has declined and (the power of) evil has grown; those who submit to us flourish"

jyutping: /dou2 siu1 mo1 coeng2 seon6 ngo5 ze2 coeng1/

phonetic: "doe siu mor zhung, Shun wu jer chun"

And it rhymes

If "Forces of Evil, Come and Obey" means "you, the forces of evil, come and obey me' then I suggest:

"道長魔消,逆我者亡" (the power of) evil has declined and (the power of) good has grown; those who resist us perish"

jyutping: /dou2 coeng2 mo1 siu1/, /jik6 ngo5 ze2 mong4/

phonetic: "doe zhung mor siu, yiey wu jer mong"

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