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I'm trying to write a piece about sexism, that specifically discusses the gender wage gap and how it's affected by race. The sentence I'm trying to say is, "Latina women have to work until Nov. 20 in order to earn what a white man would have earned in the year before", I'm not sure if it makes sense though. Does this sound natural? I've tried putting pieces of it into various translation devices, and it gets the right translation each time, so I'm pretty sure it means what I want it to, if a little clunky, but I don't know how to check it otherwise. Does it work well or sound weird?

拉丁裔的女人需要工作一年到十月的二十号为了赚百男人赚的钱在前的一年。

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    拉丁裔女人必须工作到11月20日,才能赚到白人男子前一年的收入。 – vuluvsa Feb 20 at 19:19
  • You can translate twice, this is a technique in NLP. – Voyager Feb 20 at 23:06
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"Latina women have to work until Nov. 20 in order to earn what a white man would have earned in the year before"

The sentence itself is kind of hard to follow. The biggest problem is it doesn't state "from what time" they have to work until Nov. 20. Therefore, the concept of "Latina women's 23 months income = white men's 12 months income" isn't expressed very clear

The following sentence would state things more clearly

"Latina women have to work until next year's Nov. 20, to earn as much as a white male earned in this year"

Google Translate result: “拉丁女性必須工作到明年11月20日,才能獲得與(今年)白人男性相同的收入”

grammatically refined: “拉丁女性必須工作到明年11月20日,才能獲得與白人男性相同的(今年)收入”

When Google Translate gives you a comprehensible translation, you know the original sentence is also comprehensible in general

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Forget machine translations, get a Chinese boy/girlfriend!

Take:

"Latina women have to work until Nov. 20 in order to earn what a white man would have earned in the year before."

Put it into clear English:

"Women have to work 11 months longer in order to earn what a white man earns in 12 months."

女性需要比白人男性多做11个月,才能挣到白人男性12个月所挣到的。

If want to put 拉蒂纳 in front, that's fine!

  • +1 for your first suggestion! :) – 米凯乐 Feb 21 at 22:04

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