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Both 華誕 and 誕辰 are more respectful ways of saying 生日 (birthday).

For 華誕, I have seen: "最高元首華誕", "蘇丹華誕", "日本皇華誕".

For 誕辰, I have seen: "國父誕辰", "先知默罕默德誕辰".

Sometimes, within a text, I see 華誕 being consistently used for the birthday of a particular person, and 誕辰 being used exclusively for the birthday of another person. So I wonder: is there a convention for selecting one over the other for particular "types" of people, or is selection completely arbitrary and always interchangeable?

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都是一个意思,一般华诞表示国家的生日,是很美妙的事件。诞辰没有华诞那么宏大美好,但也有赞美的意思。

  • 为什么国家的生日不是很美好的事情…… – zyy Apr 5 at 14:31
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    @zyy 改了答案了,多了一个“不”字,已经删掉了。 – Y. zeng Apr 5 at 14:33
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    I have difficulty convincing myself the statement "一般华诞表示国家的生日." Could someone give some examples? – NoNames Apr 5 at 16:03
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To me, "華" is simply a word-beautifier. That is, "華誕" is a "beautified" version of "誕辰." People would normally use "誕辰" in spoken language when referring to the birthday of someone (might have already died and) held in reverence, whereas "華誕" is more likely to appear in written language or the title of the event.

Edit:

I see 華誕 being consistently used for the birthday of a particular person, and 誕辰 being used exclusively for the birthday of another person. Is there a convention for selecting one over the other for particular "types" of people?

I do not think so. I think it is more likely that each organizer picked the word for their own events (or holidays,...etc.) and stuck to the names. Or it could be the preference of the writer (or journalist,...etc.) if such convention is not established.

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