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Is this a correct translation? Emphasis on being colloquial - the tone similar to Eminem's "Y'all act like you never seen a white person before"

What, you look like you've never seen a Chinese girl speak English before! 您真的没看到中国女孩说英语吗?

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您真的没看到中国女孩说英语吗?
What, you look like you've never seen a Chinese girl speak English before!

It needs a 过

As dan and Tang Ho indicate, it's missing a 过. See Expressing experiences with "guo":

The aspect particle 过 (guo) is used to indicate that an action has been experienced in the past.

Compare:

他没看到我。 He doesn't see me. [perhaps present tense, e.g., 他 could refer to a taxi driver who doesn't see you]

他没看到我。 He has never seen me. [past tense = 去式 in Chinese]

See Result complement for more about 没看到. There's also a related question here: What is the difference between 看到 and 看过?

Other issues:

After adding in the 过, the Chinese and the given English translation don't match:

您真的没看到中国女孩说英语吗?
You really have never seen [a] Chinese girl speak English?

In particular:

  • The given Chinese sentence does not imply "you look like". To this end, we need some combination of 看起来 = "appear" and 好像 = "as if" or 就像 (there's other possibilities like 似乎). But this seems wordy in both Chinese and English.

  • I feel like there's a mismatch between (nín), the polite form of "you" and the informal tone of the rhetorical question. Indeed, by using 您 it sounds like you're asking a serious question.

  • There's no equivalent to "never" in the Chinese. It could be included with 从来没 or 从未. I think 从来 is first encountered when learning Chinese, however.

  • In this context, I don't see a big distinction between 没看过 and 没看到过 here, or even 没看见过. (There's some websites which discuss 看 vs. 看到 and 看 vs. 看见, which seems to indicate all three are okay.)

  • There is no "What" in the translation. Literally it's 什么, but I'd instead suggest as a grunt of surprise.

  • The Chinese is a question, whereas the English is not.

Rhetorical questions using 难道

A nice way to phrase rhetorical questions is with 难道 which means something like "don't tell me that ...", which takes a bit of getting used to. See Rhetorical questions with "nandao".

嗯,你难道从来没看过中国女孩说英语吗?
Oh! Have you never seen [a] Chinese girl speak English?

I think this captures the spirit of the question well, i.e., expressing surprise and disbelief.

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  • Hi Becky, what would be a more colloquial way of saying this? The tone being more like Eminem "Y'all act like you never seen a white person before" – ina Nov 27 '19 at 23:37
  • That’s beyond anything I could answer. Perhaps ask another question. – Becky 李蓓 Nov 28 '19 at 0:28
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you look like you've never seen a Chinese girl speak English before! // 您真的没看到中国女孩说英语吗

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  • hi! do you think that it should omit the dao? 您真的没看过中国女孩说英语吗 – ina Nov 27 '19 at 23:42
  • @ina Yes, you can. But 到 adds a bit emphasis. – dan Nov 28 '19 at 0:05
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"What, you look like you [have never seen] a Chinese girl speak English before! "

"什麼?你看起來就像你[從未看見過]中國女孩說英語似的"

"什麼?你看起來就像你[從未見過]中國女孩說英語似的"

"起" in "看起來" and the second "你" can be omitted; "没" can replace "未" ; "看到" can replace "看見"

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1

What, you look like you've never seen a Chinese girl speak English before!

不是, 你这就像从来没见过中国女生说英语一样! [or 你是从没见过中国女生说英语么!?]

"过" is necessary since we used "have seen". So the answer to the title is: no, not good enough.

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