2

Occasionally one sees the word 撒币 in modern media and google translate translated it as "Sprinkle coins", which I think is inaccurate: does it not mean "to squander"? I failed to find this word "撒币" in a formal dictionary. Is it considered as a proper word which is acceptable in formal writings?

3

Wiktionary

Verb

撒幣

(derogatory, slang) to invest or give (as financial help) a large amount of money to foreign countries

And:

Etymology

From earlier 大撒幣, a pun based on near-homophone 大傻屄 (“big dumbfuck”).

  • Both 撒币 and 大撒币 can mean spending large amounts of money while also being euphemisms for 傻屄 and 大傻屄, depending on the context.

E.g.:

NTDTV

相信北京当局在短期内不太可能继续在国际上“大撒币”。

| improve this answer | |
2

When you type fuck, some website may change it into ****. To avoid that you might type fark instead of fuck. In China you can't type 傻逼, otherwise the website will change it into **** or even just screen it. To make sure those people understand what we want to say to them, we use 撒比 or 撒币 instead. They sound like 傻逼 but appear just like a normal word, so it would not be screened. Thus people know what we really want to type.

| improve this answer | |
0

No. Fair to say that's one of the internet words. (can find the meaning from comments)

As some people type words with mistakes in early ages (or sometimes happens for slight different pronunciation among different areas in China), but got massive attention/imitation online, and, booom, a new word born.

Now some words even indicate some kind of identity for different generations.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.