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What does "Fangcang" literally mean in "Fangcang hospital" where China relocated those infected with Covid-19, but who had only mild (or no) symptoms?

Somewhat "close but no cigar", a Lancet paper explains

The term Fangcang, which sounds similar to Noah's Ark in Chinese, was borrowed from military field hospitals [...]

But it's still not clear to me what the word actually means.

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Edit:

After reading fefe's comment, I did more search and found this 方舱医院是什么

方舱医院是以医疗方舱为载体,医疗与医技保障功能综合集成的可快速部署的成套野外移动医疗平台

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So "方舱" is obviously referring to those rectangular mobile units.

方舱医院 should be translated as "mobile cabins hospital"

As for the relationship between 方 and 方舟, may just be a coincidence

It is easy for people who never heard of 方舱 to link 方 with 方舟, due to the current crisis. If 方舱医院 didn't exist before this pandemic, my previous theory would be a fitting one

Previous theory:

"Noah's Ark" in Chinese is 「諾亞方舟」 or 「方舟」 (literally mean 'square ship') 「方艙」(Fangcang) is made up of 「方舟」and 「艙」(cabin) "Fangcang hospital" literally mean "Cabins of Noah's Ark hospital" We all know what the term 'Noah's Ark' implies

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  • Do you have a source that show this theory? – fefe Apr 6 at 12:46
  • 「方艙」 is mentioned here takungpao.com.hk/news/232108/2020/0207/413521.html. Notice 艙 Radical is 舟, Which mean 艙 is referring to ship cabin – Tang Ho Apr 6 at 12:48
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    I mean, the link between 方舱 and 诺亚方舟 – fefe Apr 6 at 12:50
  • Notice 艙 Radical is 舟, Which mean 艙 is originally referring to ship cabin – Tang Ho Apr 6 at 12:52
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    It seems that "方舱" is not limited to be used for hospitals. It has a lot of other use in the military. here a lot of different 方舱 are listed: "军、民用方舱、防弹方舱、通讯方舱、移动方舱、监测方舱、气象方舱、医疗方舱" – fefe Apr 6 at 13:18
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Literally, "Fang" means "square". "Cang" means "cabin". So it just means square cabin hospital. The Chinese Army call it this name just for imaginary and brevity.

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