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I found the following sentence:

我很长时间没看电影了。

Wǒ hěn cháng shíjiān méi kàn diànyǐngle.

I haven't watched a movie in a very long time.

I believe 很长时间 (very long time) is the duration of the action 没看 (haven't watched).

Q1: Why is it located before the verb when duration should go after the verb?

Q2: Does the final 了 indicate a change of status suggesting the speaker wants to watch a movie soon?

  • I just found out my answer to Q1, from Claudia Ross, Jing-heng Sheng Ma - Modern Mandarin Chinese Grammar: Indicating how long it has been that something has not occurred: In Mandarin, only situations that occur can be described in terms of their duration. If a situation does not occur, the duration pattern cannot be used to describe it. To indicate the length of time that something has not occurred, put the time phrase before the [prepositional phrase +] verb or verb phrase. – Puco4 Jun 21 at 20:20
  • You can answer your own question below actually, instead placing it in a comment. – Kumāra Bhikkhu Jun 22 at 8:25
  • is 长 typically used in this way? I normally associate 久 with time durations – 小奥利奥 Jun 23 at 11:52
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Q1: Why is it located before the verb when duration should go after the verb?

The explanation you posted in your comment is correct. Reposting it here for clarity: when expressing the duration of an inaction, the duration complement goes before the verb, following the pattern:

Duration + 没 + Verb + 了

Q2: Does the final 了 indicate a change of status suggesting the speaker wants to watch a movie soon?

No, it indicates the change of status that occurred when you started not doing something.

In your example, it's the change from watching movies to not watching movies.

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