2

I know it's a grammatical role that 一 plays in such sentences, but unfortunately I didn't find it on Chinese Grammar Wiki. So what's the meaning of 一 in this sentence?

听百灵鸟这么一说,她明白了

I suspect it's "have just", but I want to understand it 100% correctly.

4

Talking skylarks?? Where are we??

I think you can understand this 一 as 'once' or 'as soon as'

听百灵鸟这么一说,她明白了。
As soon as she heard the skylark speak, she understood.
Once she heard the skylark speak, she understood.

You can also not translate it: Hearing the skylark speak thus, she understood.

Or, to borrow Tang Ho's example:

二人向来不睦,一见面就打架。
Those two are always at odds, as soon as they see each other, they start fighting.

1
  • We are in a fable ;) In fact, I know "一 ... 就 ...", but I thought "一" alone means something different. But apparently it means exactly the same thing.
    – musialmi
    Oct 1 '20 at 7:14
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[一 + v] = [once /upon + v]

听百灵鸟这么说,她明白了 = After hearing the lark said it like that, she understood

(一)听百灵鸟这么说,她明白了 = (Upon) hearing the lark said it like that, she understood

听百灵鸟这么(一)说,她明白了 = Hear the lark (once) said it like that, she understood

It would be easier to understand if we omit 听 and write: "百灵鸟这么一说,她明白了" = "The lark once said it like that, she understood" ("heard" is implied)

Note: depend on context [一 + v + 就...] can mean [once + verb + then...] or [would + verb + every time]

Example:

一見面就打架 = "Start fighting upon seeing each other" or "They fight every time upon seeing each other"

不知如何,這兩人一見面就打架 = For an unknown reason, the two started fighting upon seeing each other"

二人向來不睦,一見面就打架 = The two have not been friendly to each other, and they fight every time they meet"

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  • 1
    seems like an odd coincidence for the number one in Mandarin to server the same purpose as the word "once" in English Sep 30 '20 at 23:51
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This dictionary definition addresses the use of 一:

(用在动词或动量词前面, 表示先做某个动作, 下文说明动作结果):

get over in one jump;

一跳跳了过去

This explanation of his restored our confidence.

经他这么一说, 大家又都有信心了。

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