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I encountered two characters I cannot find in any database. They are side-by-side compositions of two characters that I do know, but I have not been able to use the information to find something I can copy and paste into text. I tried radical + stroke look up for the characters at https://www.mdbg.net/chinese/dictionary?cdqrad=184 and https://www.mdbg.net/chinese/dictionary?cdqrad=107 using the components as a clue and even drawing them directly into a a handwriting keyboard.

The characters below are shown with their probable homophones. (I found it in Yuen Ren Chao's A Project for General Chinese.) So I also tried looking up the Mandarin and Cantonese pronunciations on Unihan database with no luck. They are not found together on Wiktionary's lists of phonetic series either.


瞞 and ⿰食㒼

瞞 and ⿰食㒼


脫 and ⿰兌皮

脫 and ⿰兌皮

2

𩞘

同【满】。

simplified as:

𬳏

𤿫

表皮破损、脱落


The website zisea has a function called 两分 where you can easily find these characters.

For the first one you just search 食㒼 as you put in your question:

enter image description here

For the second one you need to change 兌 to 兑 and search 兑皮:

enter image description here

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  • Plain as vanilla. I like it!
    – Kevin Li
    Oct 14 '20 at 23:20
3

it’s time to try the 異體字字典, maintained by the ministry of education, taiwan 🇹🇼

https://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/variants/rbt/home.do

the second character is explained as:

1.表皮剝落、破損。見《玉篇.皮部》。

2.皮壞。見《集韻.入聲.沒韻》。

https://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/variants/rbt/word_attribute.rbt?quote_code=QzA4MTQ2

have fun :)

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  • Gosh. I was just on that site and the tab for it still opened! The pronunciation for the character is unexpected from Chao's phonetic description. But more interestingly, as a testament to the rarity of its usage, "𤿫" (found on Unihan using the pinyin) shows up as a tofu character on my Android phone---which is extremely ironic given that the font it uses is called NoTo (from No Tofu). Still no luck with ⿰食㒼 on the site currently. I tried both phonetic look-up and by radical/stroke (食 + 9 or 10 strokes).
    – Kevin Li
    Oct 14 '20 at 2:31
  • 1
    @KevinLi you should use character component lookup, not radical/stroke or phonetic look up (which is inefficient and extremely unreliable even among common characters) . guoxuedashi.com/zidian/z66595o.html
    – dROOOze
    Oct 14 '20 at 6:17

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