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I don't understand the use of 扒 in 腿絲芥膽, see below. Other examples are 腿絲桂花膠菜苗, 碧綠扒三菇, 皇子菇扒豆苗. CUHK translates as

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None of these English verbs fit! All the Chinese I know comes from Chinese restaurant menus. I would've picked 配 like 腿絲芥膽, 北菇菜膽, 蟹肉雙蔬. I asked at least 7 Chinese waiters this, and they all replied they never heard 配 used like this.

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Top. Middle. Bottom. Another pic not shown.

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  • Quote:” All the Chinese I know comes from Chinese restaurant menus“ Such a pleasant, satisfying way to learn a language. :) I wish I could learn French that way. Dec 27 '20 at 3:11
  • Perhaps it is more readily understood if 扒 is contextually translated as "garnish" since the 腿絲, 北菇, 蟹肉, (shredded ham, etc.), are sprinkled, scattered on top as though to "rake up", "gather up", "hold up" the main dish? Literal translation of one language to another does not work all the time. Dec 27 '20 at 3:26
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Why didn't "Rake up; gather up" make sense to you?

腿絲(扒)芥膽 = Shredded Ham (raked up/ gathered up on) Mustard

北菇(扒)菜膽 = Northern Mushroom (raked up/ gathered up on) Vegetable

蟹肉(扒)雙蔬 = Crab Meat (raked up/ gathered up on) Double Vegetables

  • 扒 (on top) -- one ingredient laid on the top of another ingredient and the two do not mix (this way, one doesn't affect the taste of the other too much. You can mix them as much or as little as you like)

  • 炒 (stir mix) -- all ingredients are stirred and mixed together (you can enjoy everything in every bite)

  • 配 (aside) -- a side dish is placed beside the main dish (you can choose to eat them separately or together)

蟹肉扒豆苗

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通菜炒牛肉

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咖喱牛腩配麫包

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  • Thanks! "Why didn't "Rake up; gather up" make sense to you?" First, because I don't know enough Chinese and English doesn't use "rake up, gather up" for vegetables. Second, the three pics show very little ham compared to the vegetables. "rake up, gather up" reminds me of lots of leaves on the ground, like in autumn in Toronto?
    – user26936
    Dec 29 '20 at 3:00
  • @I never attended university. Just think of 扒 as 'pile on top' like you rack up leaves into piles
    – Tang Ho
    Dec 29 '20 at 3:28

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