1

So far I can read most of the characters on this picture, except 1 character.

  • The characters on the center is: 忠義 (zhong1yi4 - Tiong-gī), which means: Loyalty and is related to the story of the three brothers. (Thanks to Question Overflow)

  • The characters on the left is: 千秋羕 [x] 振乾坤.

  • The characters on the right is: 萬古桃園喜永存.

Does anyone can read the character mark as [x] on the left side? I tried to google like "萬古桃園喜永存", or "萬古桃園喜永存, 千秋羕 ..", but found nothing. Many thanks.

enter image description here

8
  • Could you maybe post a higher-res image? It's rather difficult to make anything out in the photo you posted.
    – Cocowalla
    Jan 30 '14 at 13:09
  • 1
    忠義 is read from RTL and the story of the three brothers.
    – 杨以轩
    Jan 30 '14 at 15:04
  • The are some characters covered by the flowers.
    – fefe
    Jan 31 '14 at 0:13
  • 2
    Hmm, i.stack.imgur.com isn't blocked any more ... 上聯 (right hand side) is 萬古桃園春永在, 下聯 (left hand side) is 千秋華年振乾坤. 橫批 is just like what QuestionOverflow has said, 忠義.
    – Stan
    Feb 1 '14 at 14:35
  • 1
    萬古(for a very long time) 桃園(the place where "the story of the three brothers" happened) 春(spring) 永在(lasts forever); 千秋(for a very long time) 華年(youth) 振(be the leading actors of) 乾坤(heaven and earth). I think it needs a little knowledge of Chinese culture to understand it well ... However this couplet isn't a good example for learning, because it hasn't followed all the strict rules for couplets.
    – Stan
    Feb 2 '14 at 11:50
2

This is what I got: 万古XXX永存,千秋XX振乾坤。 A picture with higher resolution would be helpful for a complete answer.

4
  • @agripop: Wow thanks, please wait for the higher-res image because I have to ask it again to my daughter-in-law. :)
    – mrjimoy_05
    Jan 30 '14 at 23:52
  • @agripop: Hello, I updated the image. Please have a check :)
    – mrjimoy_05
    Feb 1 '14 at 12:22
  • 1
    Looks like 万古桃园喜永存, 千秋羕x振乾坤 to me...
    – user58955
    Feb 1 '14 at 23:41
  • @user58955 and are written in typical cursive script. "存" looks more similar to , but I'm not sure either.
    – Stan
    Feb 2 '14 at 1:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.