24

People usually say 山羊 when they mean a goat. --- I don't think so. Goat or Sheep, just only depends on the context or the environment! Actually, the scene of language is as follows: When a sheep comes, what the brain of a Chinese-speaking people presents/thinks about is: "羊 is coming." When a goat comes, what the brain of a Chinese-speaking people ...


16

I am a native Chinese speaker. This sentence is not ambiguous to me at all. Here the "怎么" clearly means "how" to me. But if you switch "要" and "怎么",then the sentence will be like: 我们怎么要去机场? Here "怎么" means "why". This sentence sounds to me like that you have a guest coming by train but your boss asks you to go to the airport to pick him up. Hope this ...


6

No, since 九十 already means exactly 'ninety', it cannot be use as an approximate figure for 'nine or ten' 'nine or ten years old' has to be written as "九至十岁" You can say 十一二 (11 or t2) , 十三四 (13 or 14) or even 十五六七 (15 to 17) but not 九十 (9 or 10)


6

I am glad to see this interesting question. The omission is really one of the most confusing but fascinating parts of the Chinese language. My explanation would be almost similar to your first one. There are two omissions in this example. One is the omission of the subject. The other is the omission of the verb. 除了价格以外,(我)(对)其他的都(感觉)很满意。 Except for the price,...


5

One way I use to "resolve" those ambiguities in a pinch is by using two dictionaries - one English to Chinese and another Chinese to English. Essentially, when looking for a Chinese word corresponding to an idea you want to express, look it up in E-Ch dictionary first, then take all the results that you think you could use, and look them up again in the ...


5

As a native speaker, I'm trying to introspect my understanding process: 借支 is not a common term. Even in the right context (the money business), it may take a while for a native speaker to realize these two characters are meant to be a word. 笔 isn't really ambiguous as its position in the sentence dictated it has to be a noun, so 支 is the measure word and 借 ...


5

The former interpretation is correct. Chinese characters are composed of components (some radicals, some phonetics, some neither). For many of the components, there are standard or widely used ways to refer to them. A common pattern is {component}+字+{旁/头/盖/底/儿/框}. (The last part refers to which part of the character it is--e.g., side, top, bottom, "...


5

One simplified character may mapping to multiple traditional ones: 皇后 -> 皇后,後天 -> 后天 頭髮 -> 头发,發財 -> 发财 As reversed, one traditional character may mapping to multiple simplified ones too: 乾燥 -> 干燥,乾隆 -> 乾隆 瞭望 -> 瞭望,瞭解 -> 了解 This wikipedia article had discussed such thing for further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


4

To be quite frank, speaking as a Chinese-Australian, everyone I've met insists that rats and mice are the same creatures I don't think the chinese know that the two exist... They just don't differentiate between them :( Now. I don't mean to start a debate. But there's a lot to differentiate. Rats are more closely linked to us genetically. Rats are ...


4

烧胎 is a technical term understood by motor-sports enthusiasts as a burnout. If you are really burning tyres, you would need to say 烧轮胎 instead: 昨天晚上我在停车场烧轮胎。 A translation for your news clipping example would be: [学生]无法去上学......因为道路被石头和燃烧着的轮胎给封锁了。 TL;DR???


4

頂真 is a rhetoric method to make sentences reading more smoothly or meaning more tightly. The connected words should be the same meaning. Check the following examples: 將軍百戰死,壯士十年歸。歸來見天子,天子坐明堂: 歸->come back, 天子->emperor 江南可採蓮,蓮葉何田田: 蓮->lotus 我出了村就過了河,過了河就進了城: 過了河->across the river But for your example like: 度 is part of India (印度) on the left ...


4

Just break the word, for example: "瘦小的猫", "(很)小的猫", or use the word "体型": "体型很小/体型偏小的猫".


3

The fastest way to resolve such ambiguities is to shed thinking in English. Right now, you're looking up an English word and finding a whole bunch of synonyms used in different contexts for it in another language, which is unavoidable for any language. In any case, those listed aren't fully interchangeable. Here's how I would translate those terms: 談, chat ...


3

未 actually attaches to 缴纳. 依法 is an adverb here that also attaches to 缴纳, and mostly still an adverb in other places, meaning a certain interest, requirement or enforcement is specified in and/or supported by national law. It's related to but not "legal," which corresponds to 合法. This whole sentence can be translated into the following: (When) The ...


3

The position of 要 is very important to understand this sentence. 我们要怎么去机场?--> We 要(will) 怎么(how) to going to the airport? -We already decided that we will go to the airport. So "怎么" can only be explained as how. 我们怎么要去机场?--> We 怎么(why) 要(will) go to the airport? -"怎么" questions the willingness of going to the airport. But when it comes to 我们怎么去机场? You ...


3

First we will deal with the origin (English): doubt is, in a sense, questioning something suspect is, on the other hands, distrusting something back to your example, you can identify the 2 sentences like this: I doubt (this 100 yuan bill is fake) thus you are questioning the bill's..."fake-ness" which implies you think it's real I ...


3

This is a very good question. Most Chinese would have no difficulty understanding your example sentence due to the sentence structure as explained by tomriddle_1234 in his answer. Once you master the basic grammatical structure and improve on your vocabulary, most of it will fall in place. In cases where Chinese do encounter ambiguities, most of it can be ...


3

from traditional to simplified, it’s one-to-one. however, from simplified to traditional, it’s a one-to-multiple Is it safe to use them? absolutely no Won't it cause any mistakes in "translation"? there’re enough mistakes that is, unsolvable without human recognition. recently, i quoted the following example in another thread: in traditional ...


2

First analyse the context in this sentence, this action happens between you and me. so 借支笔 must be predicate and the object. and "借支" is intransitive or noun, so it cannot point to "笔", if you have more vocabulary, you know "支" is the quantifier for "笔", then 借支笔 = 借 + 支笔 = adverb + object. The original complete phrase should be 借一支笔, as here "一" is saved ...


2

I think some are confused between making sentence with "怎么" and "怎么样". "怎么" should means "why" and "怎么样" should means "how". The structuring of the sentence is thus very important, else it would be a "broken sentence". 怎么我们去机场? - Why do we go to airport? 我们怎么去机场? - Might sound correct as "How do we go to the airport?" but in actual fact it ...


2

idontthinkyouneedtopractise. whenyouknowmostwords, yourmindwillgroupthemforyou.


2

There are no silly questions, just pedants! On good authority I have it, that if you want to say why are we going, you will use '我们为什么去机场?‘ 或者 ‘我们为什么要去机场?’ 我们要怎么去机场。 How will we get to the airport?


2

you need correct punctuation here. the correct writing of 他大概三四岁左右 is 他大概三、四岁左右。 for the meaning of "he is probably around 9 or 10 years old", you have to add "、" as "他大概九、十岁左右。" and when you speak it out, you need a short pause between 九 and 十, otherwise it is interpreted as "he is probably around 90 years old".


2

well, in chinese, there's a character 崽 (u+5d3d) which means "infant animal". so, "貓崽" is kitten, 狗崽 is puppy. http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=W00000009503 have fun, tomorrow is caturday  😼


2

Because you could insert more in your sentence is not proof that it was omitted. The sentence is fine as is. 除了没有电梯,其他的都很满意。 Apart from not having a lift, everything else is very satisfactory. 除了没有电梯,都很满意。 Apart from not having a lift, all is good. What you are talking about is 'everything' = 都 = all' 除了价格以外,其他都很满意。 Apart from the price, everything else is ...


1

For animals like cats, dogs, there is no ambiguity. In 小猫 or 小狗, the "小" here is understood to mean "young", not "small" since there is no Chinese equivalent of "kitten" or "puppy". I can think of one animal where 小 is not used to mean young and that is 乳猪, (Rǔ zhū), to mean a piglet, though it is perfectly acceptable to say 小猪, but not often.


1

I guess by "in print", you mean in (normal) computers, as you also mentioned Unicode code point. We use 破折号 for this. And in computers, it is not one Unicode character, but two. The symbol used is still U+2014, as I tested with my IME in Word. Two consecutive U+2014 form one 破折号 in Chinese. When Chinese fonts are applied, there usually no gap between the ...


1

There is only one main verb 缴纳 and 未 negates it. Both 依法 and 为劳动者 are adverbs that add information to the verb, and they go before the verb. Depending on how much you wish to convey about the verb, you can have the following affirmative and negative sentences: 用人单位缴纳社会保险费 / 用人单位未缴纳社会保险费 用人单位为劳动者缴纳社会保险费 / 用人单位未为劳动者缴纳社会保险费 用人单位依法缴纳社会保险费 /用人单位未依法缴纳社会保险费 ...


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