12

In classical Chinese, most of the words only have one character, for example, "目", "口", "道" (道路, road), "卒" (士兵, soldier)... One of the big differences between classical Chinese and modern Chinese is that in modern Chinese, most of the one-character words are replaced by words with lots of characters (usually 2). So both "目" and "口" are not used in spoken ...


9

There are books specifically designed for learners, such as the Chinese Breeze Graded Readers. These books are small, have constrained vocabulary, and relatively simple stories, but not so basic that you don't feel some sense of accomplishment after reading one. I read the book 错,错,错! which features police officers investigating a suspicious suicide. The ...


8

try "http://www.wannalearn.com/" search "chinese" "http://www.openculture.com/freelanguagelessons" scroll down to "chinese" section "https://resources.allsetlearning.com/chinese/grammar/Main_Page"


8

很高兴认识你 is a general greeting, which is used when you meet a person for the first time. The literal translation is "Very glad to know you!". In practice, It's like saying "Nice to meet you!" in English. Nice to meet you! is shorthand for It's nice to meet you! in my opinion. 很高兴认识你 can be paraphrased as: 我很高兴认识你 (I'm happy to meet you.)or 认识你是(一件很让人)高兴的事情 (...


8

/v/ is not an initial found in MSM. The initial /v/, though, is often found in Northern Mandarin and its branches. In fact, it can still be found, even, in distant branches like Sichuanese. If you ever saw the 马蜂窝 commercial that aired, ever single night, during the World Cup, you'd certainly notice that 唐僧's "为" is very /v/'d. You can also refer to the ...


7

中国人 is the topic of the sentence, which explains its position at the beginning. So, "As for Chinese people, ...". 爱喝茶的 is a nominalisation of 爱喝茶 "love to drink tea": hence "people who love to drink tea". Finally, 多 is just the stative verb "many". So, "Among Chinese people there are many who love to drink tea."


7

機車 and 機歪 are indecent words. As time changes, the meanings are already different. The following is one of them. The 機歪 refers to the female genitalia - 膣屄 (cunt). The Hokkien pronunciation is tsi-bai. Because it is too indecent to directly write 膣屄, it has been written as "機掰, 機歪, GY" and so on. Later, some people thought that they were still indecent, so ...


6

As a quick look at any dictionary will reveal 目 has to be considered a bound morpheme (规范词素、附着词素、粘著语素),i。e。it only occurs in fixed combinations with other morphemes, it cannot be used alone, by itself to mean eye. As bound morpheme it certainly is not archaic.


5

My personal preference is children's books and television. If you have a China town section of your local city you should be able to find a book store with children's books in them. You usually won't find these books in a regular foreign langauges store or even large chain book stores. The alternative is to go to the children's second language section of a ...


5

I built some tools to help me with reading practice. I sieved through Chinese text looking for sentences that use only the characters I know. My first attempt was with Twitter updates, but it was kind of a slow process to find and translate them. More recently, I found a huge collection of translated sentences on Tatoeba. I've collected all the sentences ...


5

The word "機歪" (simplified Chinese: 叽歪), means that a person talks too much (probably complaining about something) so that it annoys people around him/her. This is not a formal word that you could find out in a dictionary, and more like a word from spoken language. Besides, another word often used in spoken language is 機機歪歪 (simplified Chinese: 叽叽歪歪) has a ...


5

What makes this future tense vs the verb want? If it happened in the past, the sentence would be "这个 星期五 晚上 我们 去了 酒吧" - 了 indicates the action is completed "这个 星期五" (this Friday) apparently refers to the up coming Friday 我们 要 去 酒吧 could mean "we need to go to a bar" or "we want to go a bar" We cannot be sure without more context, but with the ...


4

Regarding starting with pinyin or characters: It's funny, I recently asked this question myself. In your case, I would recommend: Starting with basics of pinyin... getting the hang of pronunciation. TalkBank provides a pinyin chart that pronounces each for you given the selected tone. It's really cool. Just choose a tone, and click on a vowel/initial. Learn ...


4

You can consider radicals as affix and suffix, and when you see a common english word, most time you will not consider what's the affix and suffix means, because you know the word meaning, only when you consider on the word's source, you will discuss with the affix and suffix, that's same to Chinese. And, when you encounter a word that you don't familiar or ...


4

It's an old Chinese proverb, that's why there are some words missing. In old times, as long as people can understand what you mean, you can omit as many as words you want. The whole sentence is 人无千日好,花无百日红。 Here, 好 means happy, happy life, good life, or easy life. And 百, 千, 万 in Chinese proverbs or idioms usually refers to a very long time So the ...


4

Basic SVO form: "我开车" (I drive) = [我(s)+ 开(v) + 车(o)] or [我(s)+开车(v)] Add description of the duration : [我开(半天)车] = [I drive (half a day)] Add verb particle '了' to indicate the verb is completed : [我开(了)半天车] = [I (have driven) half a day] repeat the verb 'drive' to emphasize it : [(我)(开车)(开)(半天)] = [(I) (drive), (drive) (half a day)] Add verb particle '了' ...


4

grammar topic:complements of duration with object, raised at this site several times (still searching locations),anyhow here is an excerpt from Yufa! A Practical Guide to Mandarin Chinese Grammar 13 The complement of duration (b) The verb-repetition pattern The verb-repetition pattern is: verb + object + verb + complement. When the verb has an object, the ...


3

This is a very interesting question unfortunately I cannot vote up yet due to a lack of reputation (so I build it up now with a hopefully good answer). My wife's Chinese and that of one of my linguistics professor Vietnamese (read up on their writing system, it's quite interesting!). I'm not studying linguistics, but because of the origins of our wives we ...


3

The answer is quite simple, it is a common practice in Chinese (and any other language) that when the identity of the subject (or object) is clear, it is routinely omitted. The subject in "很高兴认识你" is clearly "我" because "很高兴认识你" is a sentence spoken from the speaker to a second person. It didn't indicate the subject was anyone else beside the speaker. ...


3

"每到教师节这一天,..." refer to the actual day, and the actual day alone "每到教师节,..." can refer to the actual day or the time period around that day. If you said: "Every Christmas, all the family members would come home from different parts of the country." It gives room to the possibility of the family members arrive in different days. (may be a day early or a ...


2

FYI, I speak Chinese. 中国人爱喝茶的多 is actually an incomplete sentence. The complete form should look like this: 比起美国人,中国人爱喝茶的多 or 中国人比美国人爱喝茶的多 So, 的多 can only be used in comparison, which means 'Far more than'. And the sentence above means 'Chinese people love drinking tea far more than americans do'. As for 中国人爱喝茶的多, you should learn it in the context, and ...


2

I had a similar experience learning Chinese (My first teacher was from Taiwan, so we learned Zhu Yin). I found that the best way to learn pinyin was through chat room practice. Live conversations gave both contextual and applicable meaning to the pinyin I was using, and therefore helped solidify my understanding of pinyin. I recommend going to http://www....


2

There is an (almost) one-to-one mapping from Zhuyin to Pinyin, replacing symbols with letters. In my humble opinion, Pinyin only save one from remembering symbols. Neither Pinyin nor Zhuyin is perfect. Better learn both of them. Pinyin is the result of an attempt of romanization, everything is going well except that, after all, Chinese language is quite ...


2

Have you had problems noticing the difference between "sheer" and "cheer", or "jeep" and "cheap"? If not, then your problem is solved. For European people, it is strongly recommended that they read articles with Pinyin (literally "Spelled Pronunciation"). Why characters are not relevant to their pronunciations? Chinese has so LONG a history that ...


2

In a less westernised way, you may say, "請問你的家怎麼走?" https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%AD%90%E5%8C%96%E4%B8%AD%E6%96%87


2

我很高兴, 我挺高兴,我真高兴, 我非常高兴 are commonly used. 我高兴 is valid too, but not that common as the sentences above. You could say 我今天高兴(I am happy today), 我高兴你能来 or 你能来我高兴(I am happy with your coming.) 我很高兴 and 我挺高兴 are interpreted as "I am quite happy." 我非常高兴 is "I am very happy." 我真高兴 is "I am really happy." 我高兴 is "I am happy," but people might use '我很高兴' to ...


2

很 is often pronounced lightly, so it is actually without any real information. It seems to fill the role of a predicate marker (e.g. 'copula') with adjective phrases. However, if it's stressed, then it does mean 'very'. (Mandarin Chinese does have stress; however, it seems to get ignored in many language classes.)


2

There’s no rule as to what tones can be used with which pronunciations but there is a finite list of words & pronunciations in MSM (Modern Standard Mandarin). When you start getting into Chinese dialects and topolects any pronunciation is possible. —— Just as a side note né can be found in 哪吒 (Nézhā) the name of a deity.


2

There is no difference in meaning. Think of it as the difference between Every Christmas, ... Every Christmas day, ... Admittedly, this isn’t the best analogy, as Christmas can refer to the period of festivities leading up to Christmas Day. 這一天 is the kind of addition you may find in spoken language, as 每到敎師節 is the kind of phrase that has a chance to ...


2

There is no future tense in Chinese grammar. Plans and expectations for the future are therefore expressed with words like 要. If you think about it, saying "we will go to the bar" only means that you now plan or want to go to the bar. You can't know if you actually go until it's done. The English word "will" originally also meant "want", after all.


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