19

Among the handwriting styles 章草, 今草 and 狂草, 今草 is the most frequently used. However, compared with 今草, 行书 is even more popular. That's because: 章草 is the rapid writing of 隶书. Currently, Chinese teachers don't teach 隶书 in primary schools for its old style. Only calligraphy amateurs and experts would learn 隶书 so as 章草. 今草 is based on 楷书 -- 楷书 is formally ...


11

Before simply answering "there is such a font", I would like to seriously suggest you should not differentiate a dot and a slash. The reasons are: Many Chinese people don't distinguish them when writing, even calligraphers. We care about "fast" and "beautiful". The standard glyphs among mainland, Taiwan/Hong Kong, Japan and ...


10

There might be a bit of misunderstanding about where cursive script comes from. Many cursive characters do not actually come from regular script, but are derived from Warring States era brush calligraphy and seal script shapes. This here cannot approximate the shape or follow the stroke order of 秦簡23.1睡虎地秦簡東漢隸嵩山太室闕  as the left part isn't as emphasised as ...


6

The words are "天行健,君子以自强不息。地势坤,君子以厚德载物" from 《周易》。 君子以自强不息 means one(君子) should keep on hard working and self-improvement. 君子以厚德载物 means one should take responsibilities and be open-minded. This is a motto of man's behavior. "天行健" and “地势坤” are terminologies of 八卦, a kind of divination. The way of man's life is extended from the result of divination. ...


5

To start off,「木」is not supposed to have detached legs and end up looking like「朩」. In one of the most stringent glyph standards, Kangxi Dictionary style Ming (Serif), if the Shuowen small seal shape contains「木」, then it does not have detached legs. This is for glyph shape fidelity reasons, and conversely, if it has detached legs, you can be certain that, at ...


5

Starting from the seal script, the left character is either 歡 or 觀 (from 趙孟頫 as well). I can't guess which one because the top-right part is blurred. As for the right-hand side one, I don't know much, but I'd say that there is either the radical 羽 which looks like or , or the radical 羊 (趙孟頫) (if we don't consider the seal's border as an integral part) ...


4

It really boils down to the very point: your knowledge of characters and especially how familiar you are with them. I have a hard time reading a lot of things handwritten in Chinese, while at other times I notice that I can just spell out all the characters, even if I have never seen a single character from that person. Some people have easy to read ...


4

Simplified Chinese is much simpler than 行書, involving less strokes overall. Two reasons: Many simplified characters were already derived from cursive forms (草書楷化). Examples include 書 → 书, 車 → 车, 興 → 兴. 草書 is much less strokes than 行書. Simplification involved many different techniques, including removing entire radicals or portions of a character, like 習 → 习,...


3

From a Unicode perspective it is the same character. Depending on the font and the environment you are using it may look different. Take for instance a look at the code charts of Unicode 12: As can be seen above the Chinese and Japanese tend to write the same character slightly differently. If you check what font and language that is used on Duolingo, you ...


3

井・飛影露走・ 閒坐階前為有情 萬里碧空雲似錦 月・團扇不分明 茗函冷澀石生斑 苦竹・・・檻間 扇影生寒消月魄 ・聲邊・成雲山 ・・・影玉西沉 落・江上變秋音 誰知錦瑟・・然 玉露微霜正傷・ 結合畫面來看,是思歸之詩。秋仲,霜降露結之日,月朧雲疏之時,少婦執團扇,捧香茗,倚坐石邊階前,是“為有情”也。至月沉日更,霜已成露,沸茶作冰,不知何處秋音自起,再添神傷。 (但是詩寫得確實不咋滴(坐了這麽久居然還沒凍死)) 不過特意自題“飛鴻”、“舊王孫”,還叫“溥儒”,不得不讓人揣測“美人自喻”,“黍離麥秀”,“故國招魂”那檔子事情。


3

If you look more carefully, you can see that the last stroke is different. 贝 bèi ends with a 捺 nà stroke. 见 jiàn ends with a 竖湾钩 shùwāngōu, a 'hook'. Check this list.


3

Don't know if it counts, but in mainland China, some people write on the street with a huge writing brush, half as long as an adult is tall. And they only dip the brush in water to write. After the water evaporates, the writing vanishes. It's the same principle as 水写布 Beijing - Public calligraphy by Roman Harak licensed according to CC BY-SA 2.0


3

The idea behind Simplification was not really to write faster - it was one of several other movements to abandon the administrations and culture of Imperial China, and modernise into the Republican Era. One of the other movements to do with language completely succeeded, which is why the common Chinese language is now based on a vernacular standard rather ...


3

Haha, it is difficult even for a native to decipher very cursive or bad handwriting. Basically, when we read, we are only certain about some of the characters and then deduce other characters based on rough shape, context, or other clues. As for writing, elementary students in low grades are assigned to repeat writing one character for ten or more times in ...


3

The large calligraphy says 髙(高)明⿰酉卩(配)天 The seal says 𢿩(敬)璧 「高明配天」 is a short segment from the Doctrine of the Mean. The entire line that this segment is found in is ...博厚配地,高明配天,悠久無疆... ...one's learning as expansive as the land on this earth, one's achievements as noble and lofty as the blue sky, lasting through to eternity... The seal 「敬璧」 is part of ...


3

I would just call it 一笔画 (one stroke). Because there are some famous arts are called in this way. Like: 一笔虎: write the character 虎 in one stroke. 一笔龙: write the character 龙 in one stroke. And the Eulerian path is also called 一笔画问题 (the problem of how to draw a graph with one stroke)


3

The first three characters are indeed 「牧者所」, with 「牧」 written with a corrupted 「攵」 which appears as 「文」. The last character is a reshuffled 「𢜤」, which in the current script is written as 「愛」. 戰國・晉金󱩃𧊒壺集成9734戰國・楚簡六德・17郭店楚簡隸定  「愛」 (Baxter-Sagart OC: /*[q]ˤə[p]-s/, [benevolent] love) was originally written as 「㤅」, comprised of semantic 「心」 (heart) and ...


2

I think you should use a fuzzy system instead of a strict one. The difference between 點(dot) and 捺(slash) is not always obvious even to native user. For example, in lower right corner of the character 木, the stroke is a slash, but when we writing the character 林, the slash become a dot in the left 木. Why? because there is no room to put a full slash there. ...


2

So sorry for bringing up such an old thread, but I want to put something here that might be useful for anyone searching this thread later on. I used Google Translate and with my limited knowledge of Chinese writing character radicals and strokes I tried to write the characters I see with the handwriting feature. The thing is that the software does a good job ...


2

My best guess, 1st poem is: 井梧飛影・・・ 閒坐階前美有情 萬里碧空雲似錦 月・・・・・・ 2nd is: 茗函冷澀石生斑 苦竹・・・・閒 扇影生・消月魄 ・・・・・雲山 the 3rd one is: ・・・影玉西沉 ・・江上・秋音 誰知錦瑟・・・ ・・・・・・・ remaining characters are: 西山逸生詩・・・・・


2

This is a painting by the Qing imperial descendant Pu Ru (溥儒). I'll leave someone else to do the calligraphy, as it's beyond my ability. 飛鴻 Flying swan 舊王孫 Descendant of the former monarchs 溥儒 Pu Ru 明夷土


2

This is an incomplete text of the poem 《西江月・作伴修行未是》 by Yuan Dynasty poet 譚處端, produced verbatim from the image, detailed below: The text is split into columns from right to left as on the image, with pauses inserted at「//」. Characters inside parentheses()indicate the modern equivalent. ⿰亻𠆦(作)伴修行未是 // 𩙞𩙞(飄飄) 物外行持 // 孤雲野鶴 任東㢴(西)// 何有些兒礙 滯 // 淡飯𢒫(尋)他兩頓 ...


2

御 royal; imperial 箸 chopsticks The dot at the right-hand side of the 者 component is due to different typefaces.


2

忍 (traditional/simplified):to resist or suffer; a more positive translation might be to endure or persist 壽 (traditional) / 寿 (simplified):longevity; usually wishing an elder a long and happy life


2

I'm afraid that the other answer missed the point here - the font that Duolingo displays is a East Asian Gothic typeface, which is a derivative of Ming Typeface. Gothic and Ming are print typefaces, and you don't use them to imitate handwriting (orthography, as specified in the question). Yes, your Duolingo does indeed show a Japanese or Korean printing font,...


2

The seal pointing to the artist name says 任可澄. In particular, you're very unlikely to find out the last character 「澄」 through a simple search: The right hand side of the character 「澄」 in the seal is actually 「⿱豆廾」, which is a variant shape of 「登」 sometimes appearing in bronze inscriptions. 「澄」 is not a character appearing in bronze inscriptions, so the ...


2

What is the script type of the large main text? it’s bronze script. you may compare the text with the 漢語多功能字庫 http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=高 http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=明 http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=配 http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?...


2

There's nothing here but the artist name, which is 羅鼎華 (Mandarin: Luó Dǐnghuá). The calligraphy says 鼎華 Dǐnghuá The seal says 羅鼎蕐(華)印 Seal of Luó Dǐnghuá


2

There is no signature on the art. Calligraphy: 賀壽圖 Art piece dedicated to the celebration of the birthday of the elderly Seal: 北海貝雕 Shell-engraving-art from Beihai


2

These four characters are "牧者所爱" in Clerical script font. "牧者所爱" is a title of a Hymn. The English title is "DEAR TO THE HEART OF THE SHEPHERD," written by Ma­ry B. Win­gate.


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