11

The premise of the question is a bit backwards. It's not that de evolved into three different characters, it's that three different words evolved to have the same pronunciation in modern Mandarin Chinese. Mandarin in particular, features unstressed syllables, which are commonly referred to as having a "neutral tone" rather than having one of the four main ...


6

These two are completely the same, they are just two different writing systems. 起 without a stroke is the simplified Chinese which is used in mainland China and Singapore while the character with a stroke is the traditional Chinese form which is mainly used in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Above is an image from Baidu, it illustrates the different forms of this ...


6

焿 is a character on its own. ZDic:http://www.zdic.net/z/1d/js/713F.htm gēng 〔~子寮湾〕地名。在中国台湾省东北海岸。 Wiktionary: https://zh.wiktionary.org/zh-hans/%E7%84%BF “焿”是“羹”的异体字,为台湾本地自创的形声俗字。 羹 means '(thick) soup, broth'.


3

i would use 教育部異體字字典: http://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/variants/rbt/home.do it's authoritative, and most comprehensive. eg 御 (u+5fa1), it listed 37 variants :) http://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/variants/rbt/word_attribute.rbt?quote_code=QTAxMjk1 have fun :)


3

Those are 六十四卦 symbols, which is extension of 八卦 They are not characters but symbols. Each symbol has a corresponding Chinese character and representative meaning as the figures indicated For example, the symbol of the first 卦 is three solid lines. It is read as '乾' /quān/ and it represents '天'(heaven) 八卦 六十四卦


2

I couldn't find [it] in Pleco. Here's a simple way to find it in Pleco. You need to have the: Fullscreen Handwriting Recognizer ($9.99) add-on activated in Pleco. Then all you have to do is write the character out to the best of your ability: and Bob's your uncle.


2

A few notes: The left hand side of that character is「火」, not「氵」(unlike in「溏」) 「庚」is not a variant component of「唐」.「唐」(boastful, exaggerative; Baxter-Sagart OC: /*[N-]rˁaŋ/) is constructed from semantic「口」(mouth) and phonetic「庚」(/*kˤraŋ/). 「焿」(thick broth, soup; Pinyin: gēng) is constructed from semantic「火」(fire) and phonetic「庚」(gēng), and as mentioned ...


2

Outlier PY xián (or jiān, jiàn) FORM 閒 originally depicted a door (門), such that the moon (月) could be seen through a crack in the door, indicating the original meaning “crack, split.” COMPONENTS 門 In 閒, 門 “a double-sided door; door, gate; opening” is a form component, pointing to the original meaning “crack, split.” 月 In 閒, 月 “the moon” is a form component....


1

From your question, I have to say your Chinses study is already at a very advanced level. These pairs have only nuanced differences, even for Chinese tongue speakers (which I am). Well, depending on what your goal is: in daily life, I feel you can safely interchange these words with no confusion, but if you aim to be a Chinese master (e.g., work as an editor ...


1

報導 is more common. 報道 is rare to use. 成分 is correct, 成份 is also very widely used. 份 is a measure word, e.g. 一份報紙 兩份午餐 三份麥當勞. 3.訂單 定單, usually you can use both to express ORDER. e.g. 下訂單 means place an order. Please refer to https://hinative.com/zh-TW/questions/11595997 to see the difference. 定婚 and 訂婚, you can use 文定 to express the same meaning. e.g. 訂婚喜宴 ...


1

Short answer: no. There are occasional suggestions for a male tā character (for example, ⿰男也, in this online discussion), but none have caught on. In fact, the desire for an unambiguously gender-neutral character for tā has led some people to write "TA", even when the rest of the text is written in characters. This has been discussed by the linguist ...


1

I would suggest that there is no sense of gender in the Chinese languages since the very beginning; nor even today. We all know that the Chinese languages are very isolated and very analytic. The idea of gender, number, and case, in Romance languages may not be brought to the learning and using of the Chinese languages. Though I'm not perfectly confident, in ...


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