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Technically it isn't a new Chinese character but a Japanese character. Eileen Chow posted about this on Twitter saying: Winner of 2020’s new kanji contest in Japan: the character 座 (seat), ingeniously redesigned as a neologism for “social distance.” Note the two 人 (person) radicals in the original 座 are now positioned farther away from one another! You can ...


16

These terms were devised in the late 20th century analysis of Classical Japanese, originally, for the difference between -(さ)す (glossed as externally instigated) and -(ら)る (glossed as internally instigated). This exoactive vs endoactive reflects 18th century Japanese use of 他動詞 vs 自動詞 (tadoushi vs jidoushi). In more traditional Western-orientated linguistic ...


7

On p. 43 of ABC Etymological Dictionary of Old Chinese By Axel Schuessler we have the following introduction: which is later expound on: On p. 44 we find the exact example that you are asking about: It also comes with an explanation: There is a little explanation also here: [...] endoactive (introvert) verbs also can be tr. like mai 'to buy (something)',...


6

These two are completely the same, they are just two different writing systems. 起 without a stroke is the simplified Chinese which is used in mainland China and Singapore while the character with a stroke is the traditional Chinese form which is mainly used in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Above is an image from Baidu, it illustrates the different forms of this ...


6

Baxter–Sagart's (2014:135) view on *s.t-: Preinitial *s- had a range of effects on unaspirated stops and affricates . . . Old Chinese *s.t-, but not *s.tʕ-, evolves to MC sy- (plausibly [ɕ]), presumably through an intermediate stage [stɕ] that simplified to the Middle Chinese palatal fricative sy- under the influence of pre-initial *s: *s.t- > *stɕ- > ...


5

It's not common in publications or daily writings nowadays, but all people can recognize it. It often appears in the calligraphies or on posters. The writing space of those media is precious. And some teachers like to use it in class. BTW, the Chinese prefer the right one, the cursive style, in their handwriting. The source of it: cursive 仝, the ...


5

A few points to start off: Characters are not made up of radicals (which are strictly dictionary section headers); elements of characters which give meaning are called semantic components. The phonetic part of 「漢」 is currently written as 「⿱廿⿻口夫」.   For brevity, this character will be referred to as 「𦰩」, but note that 「𦰩」 is actually a Japanese shape, ...


5

I can give a short answer to this question. I would say both. When I entered primary school and started to learn Hanzi systematically, Pinyin is the very first thing to learn, and we learn the sounds of Hanzi by checking their Pinyin. The following picture of a typical primary school 语文 textbook shows how this work: But the other guess of yours is also ...


4

There are multiple ways to decompose Chinese characters: Decomposed into the different... Approximate English analogue Example historical character combinations etymology 有 ← 𠂇 + ⺼ components orthography (morphemes) 有 ← 𠂇 + 月 components orthography (letters) 有 ← (一 + 丿) + (二 + 冂) strokes strokes 有 ← (一 + 丿) + (一 + 一 + 丨 + 𠃌) etc The "etymology&...


4

In certain cases compound words and set phrases may be contracted into single characters. Some of these can be considered logograms, where characters represent whole words rather than syllable-morphemes, though these are generally instead considered ligatures or abbreviations (similar to scribal abbreviations, such as & for "et"), and as non-...


4

「乾」 (Baxter-Sagart OC: /*[k]ˤar/) is the original character meaning dry. Using 「幹」 for dry was sometimes found in history, but in Modern Chinese this should be considered a spelling mistake. 「幹」 is a corruption of 「榦」. 「榦」 is comprised of semantic 「木」 and phonetic 「倝」, indicating the meaning tree trunk, extended to mean main body > main organisation, cadre, ...


4

The top part of 「益」 is just a 「氺」 (水) rotated 90 degrees. 秦簡12.47睡虎地秦簡篆皿部說文解字東漢隸華山廟碑 楷  秦簡25.46睡虎地秦簡篆水部說文解字東漢隸郙閣頌 楷  This makes the top part of 「益」 just a variant of 「水」. Predictably, the character 「㳑」 is the variant with more standard components, although this character itself is not standard. Normally, a search for a list like the one in the question ...


4

According to 《通用规范汉字表》("General Standard Chinese Character Table"), "左部件或左上部件末笔为横的,应该变形为提"(The end stroke of the left part or the upper left part is horizontal character stroke(横), it should be changed upwards character stroke(提)). "骑" meets this condition. "马" is its lest part, the last stroke is horizontal character ...


4

Different from the other answers, I'm from Hong Kong and we don't really commonly teach using a phonetic system. The popular Chinese language in Hong Kong is Cantonese. And although there are various phonetic systems for Cantonese, such as Jyutping and S. L. Wong romanization. There isn't an official system. Most people I guess who speaks Cantonese in Hong ...


3

an area with many trees is called a 森林 something pointy (small on one end, big on the other) is called 尖 something that isn't right is called 歪 small pieces of dirt are called 尘 a string going through several things is 串


3

挂车 seems to mean a "trailer". Searching for "挂车号牌" brings up images of trailers, most of which have number plates that end in "挂" (see below). My Chinese is not that great but according to this document (page 15, item 5.10), trailer number plates are distinguished using the character "挂".


3

As a noun, only '乾' means 'dried product' While 幹 as a noun means 'tree trunk'. They are two different words '乾' as an adjective means 'dry' Both 乾 and 幹 were simplified to 干 in simplified Chinese Sometimes when people translate simplified Chinese back to traditional Chinese 干 was wrongly translated as 幹 instead of 乾, or vice versa. For example 蘋果乾 --> ...


3

While not an official character, a recent article put forth the pronoun: Cathy Lai, ‘X也’and ‘Ta’: The gradual rise of gender-neutral pronouns in Chinese, July 2020 It's typed "X也" since the character is not currently in use. The article describes non-binary people also use 他 (acknowledging its history as non-gendered), 佢, and TA (the Latin ...


3

Just updating the download link from above, which broke. Since 2017, they've added over 20,000 characters to the font! Download page (Traditional Chinese 下載 -繁體版) Download page (Simplified Chinese version 下载-简体版) English version (omits 95% of the links in the Chinese version)


3

练 means to practice, so 练功夫 is practicing KungFu, which is correct. 锻炼 literally means 锻造(Forging) and 冶炼(Smelting). Both actions are related to metal production. Most importantly, it means after some processes that are under extremely high temperatures, the quality of the metal is increased. So, usually, 锻炼 means some hardship will be beneficial. Like 锻炼身体(...


3

All I can think of off the top of my head: 牛羊: cattle (see the cow and goat face) 凹凸: bumps The similarity between words and objects are most likely coincidental.


3

first of all, read from right to left. the right character, the left component is 𨸏(阜, ⻖) is easy to recognise. the right component is a 口 (mouth) with surrounding stroke, so, it’s also easy to guess that it’s 阿 (u+963f) then, confirm the guess with 漢語多功能字庫 http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=阿 the left character, well, it’s also “...


3

With some exceptions (discussed below), Japanese kanji is mostly intelligible to people who can read Traditional and Simplified Chinese. One helpful contributing factor is the compositionality of many Chinese/Sino-Japanese expressions, which you could intuit the meaning of by identifying what the individual characters mean. A person who is unaware of a ...


3

the characters are “拏雲心事人不知”, read from top to bottom, right to left. the “script” is slightly distorted from standard 😿 “拏” (to grasp, to reach) + “雲” (cloud) is a metaphor of “shoot for the moon” / “have lofty aspirations” (比喻志向遠大) http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000056063 so, 拏雲心事人不知 would be: the lofty ...


3

Chinese may have many characters, but many are not in use such as some 甲骨文 and such. Many (pretty much all) Chinese characters are from drawings, with the exception of new ones such as 'biang' . Your average Chinese adult that graduated college only needs to know around ~3000 and experts know ~5000 or ~7000 if you are really good. Some characters become ...


3

There is a yearly contest in Japan for creating new kanji. Last year, the winner was a new character for "social distancing" A clever play on the character 座, meaning "to sit", where the two 人 "people" are moved apart. Some other interesting ones: "Sign language", taking the character for "sound" 音 and ...


3

Tl;dr: You may think of 年 as bearing the concept of 'year', and 父 bearing the concept of 'father' (in the usually bisyllabic modern Chinese). Put simply, modern Chinese uses bisyllabic words (雙音節詞) pervasively. Monosyllabic words (單音節詞) are much rarer. It is precisely for this reason that we only parse individual characters in classical Chinese (and also ...


2

To give some partial information regarding your questions, Olle Linge at Hacking Chinese has a recent (July 2020) article What important words are missing from HSK?. One thing he mentions is that: It should be clear that HSK is not meant to be a representation of the most commonly used Chinese words. This is very obvious in the lower levels, where words ...


2

I'm not an expert in Filipino, but I might provide a hint for you to look it up. The former Filipino president, Corazon Aquino, was born Maria Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco, where Cojuangco is pronounced similar to Chinese "许寰哥" ("Brother Kho-Khoan"), which was derived from her grand-grandfather Kho Giok-khoan (许玉寰). (Trivia info: Corazon ...


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