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0

If we are going to assume that there is enough emojis (there are probably tens of thousands of Chinese characters, and at least few thousand are required for normal conversations), yes it's possible. But we are just going to map random emoji to each character, irrespective of what meaning could emoji represent. So your sentence won't be "🐎🚶⛰️🍴🍎"...


0

Yes, it can. But it's not a good choice when you use in formal occasions. It may not be polite to the person who you are talk to.


8

Some people are already doing this for fun. Replacing (some of) the Chinese characters in a sentence with emojis. Sometimes it is used to curse, with a somewhat softened tone. Sometimes it is used to circumvent censorship. The following picture is a good example (source). You can see a "light" mode where some of the Chinese characters are replaced, ...


5

What is possible: 你好 = 你好 (consider Chinese characters as emojis; they already seem to meet the definition). 你好 = Ⓝⓘ③ⓗⓐⓞ③ (writing its pronunciation in pinyin via "emojis"). 你好 = ⿰亻尔 ⿰女子 (writing characters out as components). But if "emoji" refers to some kind of drawing, then... A character-to-emoji mapping (preserving meaning) is not ...


2

Many languages with long history started from drawing, for example, Hieroglyph was the writing system of ancient Egypt, similarly, 象形文 was the collection of letters/words used in ancient China. So, theoretically, I don't see why we can't use emojis to exprese some simple, primitive sentences. However, the problem is there are just not enough emojis to cover ...


0

For my limited experiences, they do look like my handwriting when I was in elementary school. I won't tell those are a foreign learner's handwriting or a Chinese kid's handwriting. So I guess you are right saying, it depends on the time spent on the learning and practicing. If you write more and get more sense of Chinese calligraphy, I will not be able to ...


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