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1

"可以便宜吗?" = "Can it be cheap?" "可以便宜一点儿吗?" = "Can it be cheaper?" "可以(更)便宜一点儿吗?" = "Can it be cheaper (more)?" -- compare to cheaper price 可以(再)便宜一点儿吗? = Can it be cheaper (again) -- repeat 'the action be cheaper It may be easier to understand with different phrasing: "可以便宜一点儿吗?" = "Can you lower the price?" "可以(更)便宜一点儿吗?" = "Can you lower the ...


0

The structure of the first sentence is 可以便宜. 可以 is "can", 便宜 is something like V-ing form, a noun. 再 means 'again', so it is not 'more', not a 'comparison'. 可以便宜一点儿吗? 再便宜一点儿,好吗? Those literally means: Can it be cheap? Can it be cheap again?


0

In the given example, 再 is the "future again", i.e., future tense: While 又 (yòu) is used for "again" in the past, 再 (zài) is used for "again" in the future. Expressing "again" in the future with "zai", Chinese Grammar Wiki; see also Comparing "zai" and "you" (Putting aside other grammar structures, such as 先...再....) However, the 在 is short for 正在 ...


0

1.我在看电影。 - I'm watching a movie. 2.我想再看一次电影。 - I want to watch the movie again. 在 = ing 再 = again Although the pron is same but the meaning is not same. 再 is use like "再..一次" or "再一次"(next time).


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I don't think 我再看电影 would be used along. It could be used in some longer statement such as: 等周末有空我再看电影 (I will watch (some / the) movie(s) once I'm free in weekends.) 我再看电影一定要多穿点 (I must wear more next time I come to watch a movie.) 我再看电影我是狗 (I don't want to watch movies any more.) In case 'wo zai kan-dianying' is the full sentence. It should be 在.


2

When zài followed by a noun, it can only mean 在 When zài followed by a verb, you have to check the context. -- 我在看电影 (I am watching movies) is a complete sentence. 我再看电影 (I watch movie again) doesn't sound like a complete sentence (need more context) More example: 我在钓鱼 = I am fishing (complete sentence) 我再钓鱼 = I fishing again (seems incomplete) ...


1

It expresses "already" with the structure: Subj. + 都 + Predicate + 了 Only '了' indicates 'completion of a verb' in this structure '都' in [Subj. + 都 + Predicate + 了] mean 'too' or 'also'. Try write a sentence in this structure without 了, and you wouldn't say 都 expresses "already". Example: "他(都)说 不知道" = "he (too) said he didn't know" "他(都)说 不知道 (了)" = "...


2

No, it is rarely used, and I doubt many can recognize it. It is mostly a Japanese thing.


5

It's not common in publications or daily writings nowadays, but all people can recognize it. It often appears in the calligraphies or on posters. The writing space of those media is precious. And some teachers like to use it in class. BTW, the Chinese prefer the right one, the cursive style, in their handwriting. The source of it: cursive 仝, the ...


3

These two are completely the same, they are just two different writing systems. 起 without a stroke is the simplified Chinese which is used in mainland China and Singapore while the character with a stroke is the traditional Chinese form which is mainly used in Taiwan and Hong Kong. Above is an image from Baidu, it illustrates the different forms of this ...


0

I believe this is coming from over-interpreting a popular saying in modern Chinese communities 危機就是轉機 (literarily: "A crisis is also a turning point"). People use this phrase to comfort/console someone who is in a very bad situation whether it's their fault or not. https://www.facebook.com/gingerPowerGirl/photos/a.424134801504187/634258520491813/?type=3&...


1

百郎妲 /Bǎi láng dá/ is a transliteration of your name Brenda The meanings of the individual characters in 百郎妲 is irrelevant Google transliterates Brenda as 布伦达, which is different from the one on your chop.


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The Japanese term 勤續 means "duty" 結婚勤續二十周年紀念 literally means "20th Anniversary of marry duty It is better to translate it as "20th Anniversary of Diligent Marriage"


0

I'm afraid let you disappointed that the words just only comes from its sound. Didn't have too much meaning, but I'll explain each of word at the below. 詩思妮 is sound like [shih sih ní] My first time looks the name "Cecile" I'll guess that should speak like [sih sə li], its sound is very similar to "詩思妮" But I use google to speak "Cecile" is totally ...


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adjective word that describe people +"子”,means this kind of person, only used in informal situation: 书呆子 bookworm 呆子 idiot 傻子 idiot 疯子 crazy people 高子(高个子) tall people 矮子 short people 瘦子 thin people but there is no "帅子""丑子""聪子"(maybe they can be the nickname) And it's not a common phenomenon! words below don't exist: 酷子 可怜子 美子 美丽子 快乐子 强子 弱子 壮子 活泼子 内向子 干净子 ...


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