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-3

No, actually simplified Chinese is for the low education people to learn in the past. So the simplified Chinese words always meaningless. If you know Chinese well, you sometimes can tell the meaning or even the pronunciation of a new Chinese word. For example, 爱 is a simplified Chinese word means love and 愛 is traditional Chinese. If you look carefully, the ...


1

I think they just, by coincidence, happen to look similar, (to some people I suppose) In any case they sound completely different from each other with no similarity in meaning. Just like 友 & 发.


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No, if you speak them out, they're not the same. The way how the china simplified 華 to 华 is by pronouncement. 华 can be split into "化" and "十". but you will use top part "化(Hua')" to pronounce it, "十" is just a dummy to make it different between the actual word "化". So the 畢 and 毕.


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Given enough effort, I suppose you could read, silently, the text of any language without having to actually pronounce the words out loud. Like the way we look at long medical terms spelled in the "English" alphabet, knowing what it is but would not bother to actually pronounce them? Doing this for any language may, I suppose, miss the enjoyment of ...


-2

I can't easily recognize words in Chinese scripts, I guess my father too or my grandfather too, so it's ok about readable. I can't tell this is written by Chinese or foreign by just looking at it, but Chinese people who do scripts would write traditional Chinese character instead of simplified even in China mainland. And 太 is not that being written like ...


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It's probably not what the OP has in mind, but I'm going to give this as an answer (since the question wasn't limited to a particular writing style). ☰,☳,☵,☶,☷,☴,☲,☱ These are the eight ancient Chinese 八卦 (Bagua), also known as trigrams. Going further, we have the King Wen sequence (文王卦序): ䷀䷁䷂䷃䷄䷅䷆䷇䷈䷉䷊䷋䷌䷍䷎䷏䷐䷑䷒䷓䷔䷕䷖䷗䷘䷙䷚䷛䷜䷝䷞䷟䷠䷡䷢䷣䷤䷥䷦䷧䷨䷩䷪䷫䷬䷭䷮䷯䷰䷱䷲䷳䷴䷵䷶䷷䷸䷹䷺䷻䷼䷽...


1

In ancient time Chinese people were creating new characters. Now they don't. Only new chemical elements create new character. What are the rules, what is not allowed, what is allowed? 六書造字原則 is one of the rules. Who is allowed to create one? How do you associate a sound with it too? Is it free to create your own? As far as I know, empirer and his ...


2

妙 is an adjective used to express better than expected. 妙 is composed of 女 and 少, 少女means young girl, just one 妙 means wonderful.


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There are a lot of words which are transliterated from English to Chinese already, for example, 巧克力(Chocolate), 咖啡(coffee), 卡通(cartoon) etc. However, you, as a random person, is not powerful enough to create a word like that. Nowadays I think there're two main streams of transliterated words: 1) internet and 2) global companies' branding


3

Quote:- "Maybe instead of searching for the pinyin sound, I find two characters, and then say this is "fooboo". Is that acceptable? For example, maybe 事变 is "fooboo", even though the components are shì and biàn" Yes, if you are a, say, Martian, landed (randomly), in China and wish to use the Chinese characters to depict the sounds of the Martian language, ...


0

Yes, 付不 or 副部 would sound similar to fooboo. No, 事变 would only be read shibian. Also, 付不 or 副部 would carry their associated meanings from the characters themselves. "付不" would be something like "are you gonna pay for it or not?" While "副部" would be something like "vice-department." So you need to pay attention to what the characters might mean as well.


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I play chess, so when I see a move that's particularly clever, I like to say it's beautiful. Many chess players also use this, such as Kasparov.


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Agree - it’s hard to find a word to capture the subtle meaning of 妙. This is the beauty of Chinese. In some context, I think maybe we can also use “smart”.


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There is a Go Dictionary that contains two terms that begin with 妙. 妙手 which is defined: excellent move and 妙着 [sic?] which is also defined: excellent move Here 妙 is consistently translated “excellent.” “Clever,” might also be a option.


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For those who are interested, here's a lovely song which use the word 囚 in the metaphorical sense. https://youtu.be/KV6Fkg86q1E https://youtu.be/pSqIJFr11xk


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囚犯 and 囚徒 means prisoner. 犯人 means someone who commit a crime. 囚 means confine people.


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Characters with "mouth radicals" are often chosen for transliterations. This is especially helpful to show that it is a proper noun rather than anything else, otherwise the reader might try and put meaning into characters that are simply there for their associated sounds. A similar concept can be seen in Chinese onomatopoeia. For instance "choo-choo" the ...


3

From Shijing: 《詩・小雅・綿蠻》 綿蠻黃鳥,止於丘阿。道之雲遠,我勞如何。飲之食之,教之誨之。命彼後車,謂之載之。 綿蠻黃鳥,止於丘隅。豈敢憚行,畏不能趨。飲之食之,教之誨之。命彼後車,謂之載之。 綿蠻黃鳥,止於丘側。豈敢憚行,畏不能極。飲之食之,教之誨之。命彼後車,謂之載之。 Firstly, some conceptual advice on interpreting characters: Please keep in mind that characters are not words; they only represent words. Character phonology is very important when interpreting ...


1

It appears to have originated from a poem of the same name 緜蛮 in the Book of Songs 诗经. 緜蛮黄鸟,止于丘阿。道之云远,我劳如何。饮之食之,教之诲之。命彼后车,谓之载之。 绵蛮黄鸟,止于丘隅。岂敢惮行,畏不能趋。饮之食之,教之诲之。命彼后车,谓之载之。 绵蛮黄鸟,止于丘侧。岂敢惮行,畏不能极。饮之食之,教之诲之。命彼后车,谓之载之。 Chinese poetry is exceptionally hard to read (for me at least), but fortunately Baidu Baiku has a 白话译文 "Spoken language translation": ...


1

in the book of odes (詩經), there’s a poem named 綿蠻: 綿蠻黃鳥・止于丘阿 道之云遠・我勞如何 飲之食之・教之誨之・命彼後車・謂之載之 綿蠻黃鳥・止于丘隅 豈敢憚行・畏不能趨 飲之食之・教之誨之・命彼後車・謂之載之 綿蠻黃鳥・止于丘側 豈敢憚行・畏不能極 飲之食之・教之誨之・命彼後車・謂之載之 “綿蠻黃鳥” is translated to “little oriole” in ctext.org however, the scholar 朱熹 suggested that “綿蠻” is the sound of birds (鳥聲) if you have ...


0

囚: imprison 犯: criminal 徒: person 囚犯 and 囚徒 are mostly interchangeable, 囚徒 is more literary. 犯人 means criminal, not necessarily in prison.


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犯 means "commit", and it is the same as 犯人. 囚 can mean the prison, prisoner or imprisoning someone. 徒 is similar to 人, just means a person. 犯人 and 囚犯 both emphasize that he or she is guilty, but 囚徒 doesn't. 犯人 does not emphasize he or she is in prison now.


2

This is an incomplete text of the poem 《西江月・作伴修行未是》 by Yuan Dynasty poet 譚處端, produced verbatim from the image, detailed below: The text is split into columns from right to left as on the image, with pauses inserted at「//」. Characters inside parentheses()indicate the modern equivalent. ⿰亻𠆦(作)伴修行未是 // 𩙞𩙞(飄飄) 物外行持 // 孤雲野鶴 任東㢴(西)// 何有些兒礙 滯 //...


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