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1

The notion of "bound forms" (黏着词素) is a useful tool for this sort of question. The ABC dictionary explains bound forms as follows: (Bound Form, Niánzhuó Císù 粘着词素). Morphemes which do not function as free words in a sentence and cannot be handled using one of the other bound category labels, such as prefix, suffix, measure word, or particle. A ...


1

congratulation 💐 “婷” & “婧” are both 女部英韻, so, the third one, i would suggest: 婛 (u+5a5b) http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=婛 娙 (u+5a19) http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=娙 婈 (u+5a48) http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=婈 姈 (u+59c8) http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/...


1

Most single character words contain multiple meanings, to reduce ambiguity, two characters words are the solution For example, 正 can mean: upright; straight; middle; standard; regular; correct; principal; chief; main; exactly; just; precisely; just happening; just continuing; rectify; correct; set right; positive Each of the following words has only one ...


3

Tl;dr: You may think of 年 as bearing the concept of 'year', and 父 bearing the concept of 'father' (in the usually bisyllabic modern Chinese). Put simply, modern Chinese uses bisyllabic words (雙音節詞) pervasively. Monosyllabic words (單音節詞) are much rarer. It is precisely for this reason that we only parse individual characters in classical Chinese (and also ...


1

First off, while 年華 and 年 both translate to 'year', they have different connotations. 年華 is very poetic, and is usually used to reminisce the 'good old days', or refer to enjoyable times (not necessarily by year). 年 on the other hand is just a neutral word for 'year' with no special connotations. With that in mind I think it's clear why this sentence you ...


0

I doubt there is a generation poem for Su. Generation poems typically have a limited number of characters. Once the characters are run out, an elder member of the family might choose another generation poem. The shorter the poem, the closer the family members. A friend of mine has a generation poem of 本支百世。So, people who use this generation poem are no more ...


0

Other than 張三, 李四, 王老五, when you are introduced to a new group or a person the first time, people tend to ask "璥"? 怎麼寫 (How it is composed in writing)? 有什麼含意嗎 (Does it have a hidden meaning)? If you know how to answer the questions, then it can be a sound, uncommon name. For instance, my Chinese name is 盛世開. When asked, I would say: "繁盛"...


0

全 = all; complete 普 = common; general 䔒 = name of a variety of grass The name 全普䔒 sounds very humble, and 普 is a commonly used character in transliterated foreign names. e.g. 普京,川普 (Putin, Trump ) Consider replacing 普/pǔ/ with 蒲 /pú/ (cattail, reedmace; plant of genus calamus), 蒲 is a more common character in names and it matches 䔒 better Consider ...


0

普 means common or average. It is a common words but not often used in names, a good name usually has good implication, common apparently is not a good implication. 䔒 is not a common words, it refers specifically to a kind of grass. So it is not often used in names, too. But 蓓 is used commonly in girl's name, which means unopened flower. 䔒 and 蓓 looks similar ...


1

Some dialect(Wenzhou Hua 温州话/one of the Wu yu 吴语)(and i’m one of thoes who speaks 温州话)was able to retain ancient pronunciations, in such dialect 少 is pronounced between xié and xué,or mixed。 温州话 is somewhat related to official spoken language in Song Dynasty 宋代。 温州方言发端于唐,成熟于宋,现在的温州话是当时士大夫所说的汉语 Whenzhou dialect was formed in Tang Dynasty, developed in Song. ...


1

In fact, in the earliest known Chinese characters (oracles), the situation where two or even three syllables were represented in one character is not rare... However, by the Qin and Han Dynasties, the trend of Chinese characters being monosyllabic had almost wiped out disyllabic and polysyllabic characters in the text which has the value of preservation and ...


4

In certain cases compound words and set phrases may be contracted into single characters. Some of these can be considered logograms, where characters represent whole words rather than syllable-morphemes, though these are generally instead considered ligatures or abbreviations (similar to scribal abbreviations, such as & for "et"), and as non-...


-1

I'm not a linguist, but the phonetic element should have some validity, some characters used as indicator of phonetic in a compound character. Only that you listed a limited amount of letters and got the conclusion. The phonetic 少 indicates pronunciation of 'ao' instead of 'm', the letters you listed read 'miao', though different intonations. Indeed 少 itself ...


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Baxter–Sagart's (2014:135) view on *s.t-: Preinitial *s- had a range of effects on unaspirated stops and affricates . . . Old Chinese *s.t-, but not *s.tʕ-, evolves to MC sy- (plausibly [ɕ]), presumably through an intermediate stage [stɕ] that simplified to the Middle Chinese palatal fricative sy- under the influence of pre-initial *s: *s.t- > *stɕ- > ...


0

How do Chinese characters foreigners or beginner Chinese learners write appear to natives? Weird yet right. Is there a difference? Does it depend on how long they have been learning, or are they all different from a native Chinese's handwriting? Knowing the basics is what it takes to achieve writing Chinese. Lines and curves are the most important thing to ...


1

Another example is 戊、戌、戍。Even now, I still can't tell them apart. There is this famous 戊戌變法(I had to look up a dictionary to make sure this is the right way to write it。)If I see a combination of 戍戊變法、戌戊變法、戌戍變法 etc., I can't pick up the correct one.


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