5

The whole sentence may be translated to 'The Ansu Prefecture was troubled by (the damages of) the waters of Xu'. In classical Chinese, parts of speech are easily mutable (詞類活用). Here is a typical case of 意動用法. You can consider 苦 being equivalent to 以⋯⋯為苦 (lit. 'to consider ... as bitter/unpleasant'; 'to be troubled by'). In terms of grammar, 苦 in this ...


5

You probably mean 衣錦尚絅 here. 衣:to wear 锦:brocade (clothes) 尚:to add 絅:unlined outer garment, usually made from linen Literally the phrase means "To wear brocade inside, and add linen overall robe outside" The phrase was originally from 诗经 as in “碩人其頎,衣錦褧衣。” where 褧 is a interchangeable character to 絅. And 中庸 as in 詩曰:『衣錦尚絅,惡其文之著也。』 The phrase is a ...


4

X 苦 Y 之害: X suffers from the actions of Y, or in the case of an inanimate entity, X suffers from the situation posed by Y. In other words, Y causes X to suffer. In your case, 安肅州 suffered from the situation caused by 徐水 (Xu River). Probably a flood? I know you haven't asked the following, but I'll make a suggestion anyway. A little further down you have &...


3

It may read like 轉所依之識 here in Śikṣānanda: 'to transform vijñāna which is the basis'. To me, 所依 sounds like a dummy object (for the transitive 轉) that has a slightly negative connotation, is more generic, and semantically weaker; whereas 識 is specific to the context here. They are however syntactically equivalent. Technically it should be 識, because there ...


3

Arthur Waley is indeed reflecting Chinese scholarship with this statement. In the Book of Odes 《詩經》, when 「思」 appears at the end of a line, it may be interpreted as a modal particle (語气詞), equivalent to modern Mandarin 「啊」. For example, 《國風・漢廣》 漢之廣矣、不可泳思。 江之永矣、不可方(汸、舫)*思。 How broad, the Waters of the Hàn - they cannot be swum! How long, the Waters of the ...


3

I believe in the poem, the (hidden) subject should be the horse instead. It should go like (馬)惟意所欲適 The horse dashes as it (my mind) wishes The basic sentence should be 馬適, which means the horse goes, as mentioned by 水巷孑蠻. The adverbial clause is 惟意所欲, which means 'only that the mind wishes', in other words 'freely'. In a way 惟 is there for emphasis. As ...


2

欲辟土地,朝秦楚,莅中國而撫四夷也 The grammatical subject is hidden (Liang Hui Wang, 梁惠王). What we see are four parallel verb-object constructions that describe Mencius' guess of Liang Hui Wang's desires (王之所大欲). 辟土地: 'to enlarge your territories' 朝秦楚: while normally 朝 as a verb means ‘to meet in court', this is no doubt used in the causative sense (使動用法, see fourth ...


2

民爭不分 doesn't mean 'people unified strive', it means 'people fight each other and not fulfill their duty 民爭 = 人民互相爭奪/人民互相爭執 (People fighting each other/ People quarrel with each other) 不分 = 不安分/ 不守本分 (not stay within one's bounds) My understanding of this passage is when the social moral decay, individual benevolence will show itself -- it is not noticeable ...


2

This is not a Waley phenomenon. The majority of English translators of Shih-ching (in the absence of 素以為絢兮) follow strictly the preachings of Shuowen Jiezi when interpreting 盼 in 美目盼兮, to varying extents of literality. Translation Legge 1871:95 How lovely her eyes, with the black and white so well-defined! Legge 1876:104 With dark and lucid eyes, showed ...


2

Pardon me for answering a question that was posted half a year ago, but I do feel the need to supplement by just a bit. 1. Use of the causative (使動用法) In the example 一言以蔽之, the verb 蔽 'to cover; to summarise' is used as-is. But in 多得鰻黧魚以食之, the verb 食 'to eat' is used as if it meant 使食*, or 'to make eat; to feed'. This is the causative use of a verb in ...


1

You already have a good understanding on this idiom, with the words explained, you can help yourself. 坐井而观天,曰(說)天小者(人),非(不是)天小也(啊)! Note 曰天小者 are four separate words - "say", "sky", "small", and "person". There is no connection between the individual word like 天小, and 小者, but "天" "小" and "者&...


1

Perhaps one might get a better perspective to consider how long it would take a complete newbie to the English language to read Shakespeare's plays competently, or Chaucer? Here are the opening lines of Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales" -- "When that April with his showers soote its showers sweet, The drought of March hath piercèd to the root, ...


1

What language is the Sandokai written in? broadly, it was written in literary chinese, with buddhism context; in 5 characters per verse. Is this ancient Chinese? Is there such a thing in the first place? the written chinese language, in recent academic view, would be divided into: proto-chinese: -3000 ~ -500 classical chinese: -500 ~ -100 literary ...


1

Not a native speaker but I've been studying Chinese over 10 years. 野心 seems to me to be a bit too strong, it can be used for wild ambition / careerism. 雄心 is another word that means ambition, I think it would be fine. But there is another alternative that I think could also be appropriate: 雄心壮志. You can have a look what Google translate makes of these terms. ...


1

Have a look here This interested me too a while back. “分析风头鸊鷉的资料感觉,雎鸠是风头鸊鷉的可能性大些。” 关关雎鸠 should be 关关风头鸊鷉???


1

in 論語集解義疏 volume 2, by 何晏 (p108-110 of the pdf), the remark stated: 馬融曰・倩・笑貌・盼・動目貌・絢・文貌也・此上二句在衛風碩人之二章・其下一句逸也 mr 馬 [a scholar in han dynasty] said (馬融曰), . . . “盼” means “the appearance of moving eye [seeing]” (動目貌), . . . the [origin of the] last verse is lost (其下一句逸也) judging from the question, i think that you’re “lost in translation” 😿 the english ...


1

PRACTICE: Put the following into literary Chinese: One who does good leads the heart (away) from disaster. My answer is: 君子修心遠禍 君子(good person) 修心(educates oneself) 離禍 (to get away from disaster) You can replace 君子 with 善者; 遠禍 with 避禍 or 離禍


1

the chopping of the verse is, . . . incorrect lah 🙀 the “體用歌” 太極拳。十三式。妙在二氣分陰陽。化生千億歸抱一。歸抱一。太極拳。兩儀四象渾無邊。禦風何似頂頭懸。我有一轉語。今為知者吐。湧泉無根腰無主。力學垂死終無補。體用相兼豈有他。浩然氣能行乎手。掤捋擠按採捩肘靠。進退顧盼定。不化自化走自走。足欲向前先挫後。身似行雲。打手安用手。渾身是手手非手。但須方寸隨時守所守。 roughly, “體” means “noumenon“ (本體); “用” means “usage” (使用) so, the verse “體用相兼豈有他” should be interpreted as: the noumenon (體) & usage (用), ...


1

Give me some honorifics that you wanna know about. I can give you some daily life examples. For example, the most simple honorific in Chinese is 您, which means you. You can use it to anyone to whom you want to show respect. Usually it's to strangers, somebody older than you or someone at higher position than you (in a professional environment).


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