6

(件事/佢)冇得救: (the thing/he) cannot be salvaged (literally 'rescued') (我)想幫都幫唔到: even if I want to help, I cannot (我)冇計/冇辦法: literally, I do not have any tricks for / solutions to a problem 我都愛莫能助: 愛莫能助 is an idiom and can be used colloquially, meaning not being able to help despite having sympathy for the person affected Common final particles to go with ...


5

Most likely, 牛氣 and 很牛 came from a slang '牛逼' (cow's genital) Cow's genitals are huge compare to human's. Calling something 牛逼 means it is unbelievably impressive or out of worldly awesome. 牛氣 (emitting aurar of unbelievable impressiveness) 很牛 short for 很牛逼 (very unbelievably awesome) * this example showed 牛逼 can be simplified to just 牛 There is a ...


5

There are different kinds of drama, for example, 悬疑剧, 推理剧, 感情剧, 伦理剧. What you wanted to express is a specific kind of drama -- 活剧 - Live drama 诙谐有趣而类似戏剧情节的真实事件 - humorous and interesting real events that resemble drama plots ~ 闹剧 - Farce 一种喜剧; 2. 比喻滑稽夸张的事情 - 1. a comedy; 2. a metaphor of comically exaggerated event Every day I come home to some drama. -...


4

In Mandarin Chinese, "Excuse me" is translated into "抱歉" normally. If you want to ask for a random person's help, these words are also useful: 对不起 dù bù qǐ 不好意思 bù hǎo yì si 不好意思,打扰一下 bù hǎo yì si, dǎ rǎo yí xià (I'm sorry to disturb you.) 打扰了 dǎ rǎo le 劳烦问一下 láo fán wèn yí xià 麻烦问一下 má fán wèn yí xià


4

Short answer: yes. Your understanding is mostly correct. Long answer: what happens in a sentence like 我喜欢吃好吃的 I like to eat delicious things is that you are omitting something that would otherwise appear after 的. In the example above I omitted 东西。 This omission is fine with very generic nouns. I can come up with the following: 东西 (material thing): ...


4

唔該 has two meanings: "Please" as in 請 (e.g 唔該你幫我開門 -> 請你幫我開門 -> "Would you please open the door for me?") "Thank you" as in 謝謝 (e.g 唔該晒 -> 謝謝 -> "Thanks so much!") Other terms are colloquial in Cantonese I can think of off the top of my head: 發夢 is written as 做夢 (dreaming) 老闆/老板 (interchangeable, means boss/owner) is usually written as 上司 (boss) and/or ...


4

晚安 has no emotion. 晚安安 is indeed an incorrect usage of reduplication. but 安安 is not an incorrect usage of reduplication. A girl can use this when she talks with her boyfriend to show intimacy. Yes, it sounds like a baby but that is how people show intimacy in China (maybe some Chinese, including my ex and ex-ex... girlfriend). 晚安啦 indeed adds casual or ...


4

晚安 is the standard phrase for "good night" 晚安安 is an incorrect usage of reduplication. Please don't use it. 安安 is also an incorrect usage of reduplication. Not to mention it sounds like a 'baby take' (omitted 晚 and reduplicate 安) Please don't use it to any adult. 晚安啦 is just 晚安 adding a final particle after it. Depend on the tone and pitch, it adds ...


4

It sounds like “豈曰無衣・與子同袍”. It is from the poem “無衣” in the Book of Odes: 豈曰無衣、 與子同袍 How shall it be said that you have no clothes? I will share my long robes with you.


4

the actual Cantonese words well, some argued that it’s 歇 (u+6b47) in toishan “dialect” (台山話) <https://jonathanovsky.wordpress.com/2015/02/14/再談「hea」字/> we just use “hea” to write it, no han-chinese / cantonese character is accepted, as the “original”: one of the urban myth in hong kong 🇭🇰


3

Referencing famous names is a good idea. But if it still doesn't work, you might have to describe the radicals. For example, my surname is 张. I was often asked to clarify whether it's 立-早 章 or 弓-长 张, when I told them my surname pronounced as 'zhang'.


3

Just mention a famous person with that surname, e.g. 袁紹 from the Three Kingdoms 袁崇煥, patriot, martyr, and brilliant military commander who was instrumental in repelling the Jurchens for the Ming Dynasty 袁世凱, first president of the Republic of China


3

不见不错 - there doesn't seem to be a reference to this phrase to be found... perhaps you could indicate where you saw this? 不见不散 - used to indicate a firm commitment to an appointment, in the sense that if we don't see [不见] each other then we will not leave/scatter [不散] (i.e. keep waiting). If it is to another person and you want to make sure the other ...


3

The Wikipedia page for 性别酷儿 mentions: 性别酷儿(Genderqueer、gender-fluid、non-binary) and also goes into specific definitions: 非二元性别(Gender Queer,Gender non-binary) 精神双性人(Bigender) 精神三性人(Trigender) 精神无性人(Agender) 精神泛性人(Pangender) 性别流体(Gender fluid) 中性 also works for gender neutral.


3

鼠窃狗偷 (small-time thieves): Remember the YouTube video that showed a rat pulling a pizza? That's cute; If you have a dog, does he steal your food when you are not looking? Mine did. And it was cute 毛贼 (small thieves): A thief as small-time as a hair, how much damage can it cause? 笨贼 (dumb thieves/ dumb criminals): There are many hilarious stories of dumb ...


3

鸡鸣狗盗: 泛指小偷小摸的行为。 Refers to petty theft in general. 梁上君子 汉代陈寔(shí)的家里,夜间来了一个窃贼,躲在房梁上,陈寔把它叫做梁上君子(见于《后汉书·陈寔传》)。后来就用“梁上君子”做窃贼的代称。 In the Han Dynasty, a thief came to Chen Shi's house at night and hid on the beam of the house. Chen Yu called him the Gentleman on the Beam of the House. (see "The Book of the Eastern Han, The Biography of Chen Shi in it"...


3

According to this article: Cantonese Slang of the Week: HEA To put it in the simplest of terms, to Hea means to procrastinate, be lazy, and basically try to kill time. When using ‘hea’ to describe a person, the meaning usually slightly alters to indicate that a person may be unproductive, or that their work is not up to standard. It is said that the word ‘...


3

It is in Cantonese 40歲未呀? = (Are you) 40 years old yet? = (你今年) 有40歲了嗎? 點止呀! = how could (I am) only (40) = (我) 怎么可能只有 (40岁)? 三個嫲嫲⋯⋯ = (I am ) three (grandchildren's) grandma... = (我已經是) 三個 (孫子的) 奶奶了


2

歇脚, lit. "rest one's feet". Usually this word is used when someone has been on their feet for a long time.


2

in cantonese, you may say 食全齋, sound files: 食 全 齋 or, colloquially, say 吃全素, in mandarin.


2

There is no colloquialisms equivalent of 请坐 in Chinese. Best I can think of are: 请入座, 请坐吧, 坐下吧, 入座 In ancient china, the emperor would say 赐坐


2

First level: 笨蛋,傻瓜/Dumb-ass(Sha Gua) Second level: 脑残/Brainless/Retard(Nao Can),二B(Er B),傻B/傻Ⅹ(Sha B/Sha Cha) I am not going to translate the last few, they are basically comparing people to private parts......and please....don't say the words in second level to anyone...especially if they are not even your friend.


2

You should know that in oral Chinese, there is no standard grammar. Actually all the above are correctly phrases for "Good night". We can even just use single character 安 for it. However, different phrases have different background meanings. 晚安 is the standard phase in both oral and written Chinese. The other 3 phrases are most likely used within close ...


2

晚安 and 晚安啦 are almost the same, and means "Good night". 晚安啦 may sound more casual. 晚安安 and 安安 can be considered Internet slang just to make it sound cute. As a learner, you can stick to 晚安. I seldom see 晚安安 or 安安 even on the Internet.


2

对峙 means "confrontation; stand-off" (be locked in a confrontation or face-off, with neither side attacking or retreating) It is a metaphor that means "two sides standing still like two mountains facing each other; neither one would back down nor could they advance." So I am wondering how do native Chinese speakers use this word Some example: 两军对峙多日 -...


2

My thought is: He probably said '等一下' but you didn't hear the word '等' due to the noisy environment, or the speaker's volume was too low when he spoke The only reason to use only '一下' (a sec') instead of the complete phrase '等一下' (wait a sec') is he knew you were waiting, and your expression told him that you were asking "How long do I have to wait?" ...


2

The quote is from an ancient Chinese poem collection 诗经(詩經 the Book of Odes). The original full poem is as follows (the quote in question is the first eight characters in the poem): 岂曰无衣?与子同袍。王于兴师,修我戈矛。与子同仇。 岂曰无衣?与子同泽。王于兴师,修我矛戟。与子偕作。 岂曰无衣?与子同裳。王于兴师,修我甲兵。与子偕行。 If you prefer traditional Chinese, below is the same poem in traditional Chinese: 豈曰無衣?與子同袍。...


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