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14

Yes. For Mandarin (Simplified Chinese): The Contemporary Chinese Dictionary (现代汉语词典): This one is for words and phrases. They have a version in both Chinese and English. Xinhua Dictionary (新华字典): this is for Chinese characters. Also available in both English and Chinese. I'm not too familiar with traditional dictionaries. But 國語日報辭典 seems pretty popular ...


12

Modern Chinese dictionaries include several methods for the user to look up a character. Radicals: This is useful when you don't know how to pronounce a character; Pinyin in alphabet: This is useful when you don't know how to write a character while you know its sound; Number for strokes: Based on my own experience, this only shown some characters that are ...


12

How to look up an entry in 《說文通訓定聲》? 前言 Introduction 一般中文字典的內容是按部首字形分類排列。 《說文通訓定聲》則是依音韻分類排列。 從內容順序來看,作者 朱駿聲 是假設讀者已熟悉字的音韻。 所以,他先列出自創的「古韻十八部」做為「總目」,然後才是各部的內容。 The contents of common Chinese dictionaries are classified and arranged according to the shapes of radicals. 《說文通訓定聲》 is arranged in accordance with phonology. Judging from the order of contents, the ...


9

Wen Lin is an amazing piece of software that has all of the etymological features you are looking for. The central downside is that it is a bit pricey. Most universities have a copy, though, and there may be the opportunity to get some kind of student pricing discount. (Not sure if that applies to your case.)


8

Most dictionaries are ordered this way: Section 1: 部首目录 (Radical directory) At the front there is a radical index, these are ordered by the number of strokes. So first you need to look at the radical then count the number of strokes of that radical. Once you have found your radical there will be a number next to it. Section 2: 检字表 (Character checking ...


8

For a big-data Chinese corpus, have a look at this one: (Taiwan) Academia Sinica Balanced Corpus of Modern Chinese 台灣 中央研究院 中文詞知識庫小組 現代漢語平衡語料庫 A million-word level corpus Contact: Miss Su-Chu Lin (林素朱), jess@hp.iis.sinica.edu.tw Introduction in Chinese Not sure if you can download it for free


6

Tatoeba.org is a great resource of translated sentences, and it also includes exactly what you're looking for in its tools section. It has a sinogram search page that lets you search by subglyph. When I searched for 木米女, it returned these options: 偻 喽 娄 婅 嫾 嬏 屡 屦 嵝 搂 擞 数 楼 溇 瘘 窭 篓 籹 缕 耧 蒌 薮 蝼 褛 镂 髅 The one you're looking for is number 13.


6

Before answering of which radical 将 should be, let me introduce some authoritative reference books. For traditional Chinese: 康熙字典 (compiled in Qing Dynasty) and 說文解字 (compiled in Eastern Han Dynasty by Xu Shen). The online dictionary I highly recommend is 漢典. For simplified Chinese: 新华字典. Its online version is 在线新华字典. However, I find the online version is ...


5

I found the ABC Etymological Dictionary of Old Chinese to be a great source if you're interested in the evolution of the prounciation and meaning of Chinese words. It avoids etymology of character structure though; for that, I would suggest chineseetymology.org.


5

金山词霸 is a popular E-C dictionary among Chinese users: http://www.iciba.com/ It also has a downloadable version: http://cp.iciba.com/ .


5

Xinhua Dictionary is kind of a gold-standard for Chinese dictionaries, similar to the place Merriam-Webster holds in the English-speaking world.


5

Only other two freely available that I'm aware of are Adsotrans and LDC wordlist. Adsotrans is based on CC-CEDICT, but they also include (for non-commercial use) software for segmentation, hanzi2pinyin and apparently some sort of semantic analysis. I don't know whether dictionary itself differs from vanilla CC-CEDICT. Their download contains SQL instead of ...


5

On http://ctext.org/dictionary.pl?if=en you can see how a character evolved, the simplified and traditional characters. For example for 目. Another similar website is http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx . Their result for 目. Zdict is completely in Chinese: http://www.zdic.net/zd/zi/ZdicE7Zdic9BZdicAE.htm Here is another website in ...


5

【方】 Is short for 方言. 方言 is defined by mdbg as: topolect / dialect Why saggy is considered topolectical or dialectical, though, is beyond me.


5

The title of the book is 《新編對相四言》明刻本.


4

zhongwen.com has a very limited amount of information on each character's origin.


4

This question could probably best be answered by Wikipedia as there are many, many methods. One relatively common one is to look up the character by stroke count, then by stroke order. In this system, there are five types of strokes and each is assigned a number. +--------+------------------------------+ | Number | Stroke type | +--------+-...


4

tentatively agree: 没问题,我试试看 tend to disagree: 应该可以 certainly disagree: 再看吧 Native Chinese here, at least for me when I heard 考虑考虑 I won't take it as "maybe", rather it sounds a disagreement to me.


4

Complete agreement: 没问题 (no problem) 我赞成 (I agree) Tentative agreement: 还可以 (still okay) 应该没问题 (should be okay) 我不反对 (I don't object) Neutral, non-committal: 让我考虑考虑 (let me consider) 让我想一想 (let me think about it) Tend to disagree: 再看吧 (consider about it another time) 再说吧 (talk about it another time) 这很难 (this is difficult) Complete disagreement: 不可能 (not ...


4

I haven't found a large corpus, but I have used the results of some projects that analysed all Usenet newsgroups from 1993-1994. You could probably contact Shih-Kun Huang for information about the original corpus. The files I used were a list of character frequencies and a list of word frequencies. It's probably smaller than you want, and it only contains ...


4

I think your phrasing may be ambiguous, so I'll answer in two ways. If you're asking if characters didn't have a radical and then one was added - thereby changing the character - for classification purpose, then of course the answer is no. If the question is to know whether the "concept" of radical existed, then you can think of it this way: if people had a ...


4

I believe that Chinese characters are born with radicals, but they were not classified by radicals until Shuowen Jiezi. To understand why radicals appeared at that time, we need to know that in the Warring States period (about 475-221 BC), characters between states could be quite different. The First Emperor of Qin (Ying Zheng, known as Qin Shihuang) ...


4

though part of the right component of the character "旅" & "派" look similar, they've different origin. 旅 (u+65c5) is a character since oracle bone script, that it's composed by 㫃 (u+3ac3), plus 2 人 (u+4eba) 旅 (u+65c5) in oracle bone script: 㫃 (u+3ac3) in oracle bone script: 人 in oracle bone script: then, the character 派 (u+6d3e), according to 說文解字 is ...


4

There isn't an official stroke order for each character, but only a subset of all characters used, and official stroke order exists solely for the purpose of educating schoolchildren. Japanese stroke order is actually not as fixed as Chinese, and the only reason it feels that Japanese stroke order is more fixed is because Japanese textbooks or dictionaries ...


4

One way I use to "resolve" those ambiguities in a pinch is by using two dictionaries - one English to Chinese and another Chinese to English. Essentially, when looking for a Chinese word corresponding to an idea you want to express, look it up in E-Ch dictionary first, then take all the results that you think you could use, and look them up again in the ...


3

Not a direct answer, just a suggestion. You may use some input method (google pinyin IME or sogou IME, for example) to input a character by strokes or by part. I use google pinyin IME and I find it works for two parts. In the case of 楼,the left part is 木 and the right part is 娄, but if you don't know 娄, 木 米 女 won't be recognized by this IME. By the stroke ...


3

Althought this doesn't answer your question as you wanted, I found a nice site, called Nciku.com, where you can handwrite characters. The stroke order doesn't matter, on the side you'll see similar characters that you can click. It doesn't require touchscreen:


3

You can take a look at : http://lope.linguistics.ntu.edu.tw/cwn/


3

This is an excellent one (and it's free too ;) ) Yellow Bridge


3

My favorite online dictionary, Nciku lets you draw in a character, and then tells you what it is. Super useful if you can't find out what the radical is, or just want a quicker way to look something out. My favorite iOS app, Pleco has this functionality, along with Optical Character Recognition (OCR) so you can hold up/take pictures of one or more ...


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