13

Yup. The typical phrase spoken when serving food is qǐng màn yòng (請慢用). It lliterally means "please eat slowly", but is better translated as "enjoy your meal", and serves the same function as the French bon appétit.


10

Like Semaphore said 请慢用 is good for very formal circumstances. In less formal circumstances you can say something like 慢慢吃 - which basically has the same meaning. This can also be used among family and friends.


9

The other answers covered the translation part. I am going to give my two cents on the culture side. Is there a set-phrase that is often used to express this idea? I don't think so, because traditionally Chinese don't really respond that way. If someone is 'predicting' your order, he's really saying 'I know what you like' as a gesture of intimacy, ...


7

I can't recall any Chinese expressions used in the same way as calling out with 'Surprise!' in English. I guess the reason might be that Chinese Culture doesn't make Chinese people as playful as English Culture making its people. We say something different from 'surprise!' in similar cases: I bring a gift to a friend, before showing him/her the gift, I say:...


7

I can only give some possible translations based on your explanation of "For all I know": For all I know, he might have gone abroad. 他说不准出国了呢。 For all I know, she doesn't even work there anymore. 她没准已经不在哪工作了呢。 For all I know, the test hasn't even been written yet. 测试题说不准还没出呢。 We would use "说不准" "没准" and things like that to ...


7

I do not think that such a list exists. If it did, Chinese-speaking learners of English would never need to struggle with the pronunciation of their new language. Let's say we have a List E, which contains all the phonemes in English (whichever variety you choose), and another List C, which contains all the phonemes in Chinese (again, whichever variety you ...


6

I am not a linguist. So I can only give you my perspective as a native Chinese speaker. To make it short: 看不起 is rarely used on an object, whereas 看不上 can be used on both persons and objects. Some examples: 我最 看不起 他这种自私的人。 CORRECT 我最 看不上 他这种自私的人。 CORRECT 品味一向很高的她根本 看不上 这种便宜货。 CORRECT 品味一向很高的她根本 看不起 这种便宜货。 Understandable but AWKWARD


6

my preference: "很不起眼儿" can be translated into “unimpressive”,while "其貌不扬" into "unimpressive-looking". The reason is that "unimpressive" can refer to many aspects such as his appearance, his achievement, and etc. Compared with"很不起眼儿", ""其貌不扬"is more specific to the appearance, so "looking" is added to "unimpressive".


6

各施各法 Each person does (it) his own way. It comes from a longer phrase: 八仙過海,各施各法 Which is about eight fairies in Chinese mythology. When they needed to cross the ocean, each did it his/her own way.


5

I agree with you that the English classification you are using is not accurate because the strong negative inference is lost. 不起眼 represents the outer idea: but just taking 起眼 shows the highly negative implication of the main term: Therefore as you've noted, the English term is much softer than Chinese term used in this case. Regarding your side question, ...


5

ABC: inconspicuous; not striking; unremarkable A Chinese-English Dictionary: DIALECT not attract attention; not be noticeable; not be attractive 这座厂房并不起眼, 但产品却是第一流的。 Zhè zuò chǎngfáng bìng bù qǐyǎn, dàn chǎnpǐn què shì dì-yī liú de. The factory building doesn't attract much attention, but the products are first-class. 别看这人不起眼儿, 人家可是一肚子学问。 Bié kàn zhè ...


5

To rate something, I would say: (要)在十分內打個分數,(我會給六分) On a scale of 1 to 10, (I would give it a 6.) 在十分內 = Under a score of 10, 要 is just optional. Other ways of saying are: 若要评分,我会给...(To give a score, I would give...) 如果要我给分数,我会给...(If I have to rate it, I would give...) It is not frequent in Chinese to say something like this, comparing to English. ...


5

昏庸无能 is very close. it means: have no ability to do even a very simple project. have no management skill to manage a team.


5

That should be "江郞才尽" "江郎才尽" means someone was always writing good articles, but one day, his article is not that good anymore.


4

Essentially it's form of concession, either through a counterargument or the acquiesence of a mutually agreed upon opinion. There are different ways to express concession in Chinese. Here are some possible translations that I can think of based on your examples. This is far from exhaustive and some of them might be preferred over others depending on the ...


4

There's no real special phrase for this situation, unlike English's "I beg your pardon". Therefore, anything conveying the sense of "please repeat" or "I didn't hear" works. For instance, as is increasingly the case in English as well, normally you could just say "what?", 什麼?. To be a little more preciser, as well as polite / less familiar, you could say ...


4

Note that 啥子树子招啥虫 emphasizes more on similarity of couples of marriage. 龙生龙,凤生凤,老鼠儿子会打洞。 Dragon's son must be a dragon, phoenix's son must be a phoenix, and that of a mouse must can dig holes. Meaning: A great man teaches out great sons, a noble man cultivates noble sons. Normal people have only normal posterities. Sometimes we neglect the second half ...


4

Since you are using the reference "dong gua tong" (冬瓜湯, white gourd soup), I assume the restaurant owner is a Cantonese speaker. The following are some commonly used responses to express your gratefulness from receiving a gift in Cantonese/Mandarin. The last two are not quite suitable in your case. They are generally used when you receive something which is ...


4

一事无成This may seem a little different from what you want when translated directly,which is 'haven't done anything meaningful'.But,it is often used to describe a pernson who can't accomplish even the easiest assignment.I believe it's a pretty close one.


4

The Chinese only have the plain and dry "组织能力差". As for translation, there is a direct translation with a few touch-ups: 就算带一群酒鬼到酒坊里,他也没能力组织到让大家喝个痛快。 Added 酒鬼 because the Chinese is a less bibulous people, at least on paper. A direct translation is good in this case because there is no comparable idioms exist in Chinese.


4

I don't think there is a universal prefix equivalent to 小 or 阿. Certainly you can add 'Little', but that's not a prefix, but an adjective. In the West, nicknames follow different patterns, mainly using the first syllable of the full name and adding an [i] (-ie, -y or similar): E.g. John --> Johnnie, Andrew ---> Andy, Lisa ---> Lizzy, etc. Other countries ...


4

The break down: 「來」(come ) 「及」implies 「及時」 (in time) here. 「得」or 「不」 are the two potential particles that indicate " "able , or "unable" *You either able or unable to come in time. That's why they are called potential particles. In summary: 「來」 (come) 「不」(unable to) 「及」 (in time ) 「來不及」= unable to come in time = too late 「來不及愛你」= unable to come to ...


4

As a verb particle, the Mandarin equivalent of 返 in Cantonese is indeed 回 俾返你一啲好處(C) = 給回你一點好處 (M) = give you back some benefit Edit: First, the term 還返 is uniquely Cantonese, "我要還返本書俾佢" in Mandarin would just be "我要还本书给他". Second, 本 is a classifier without determiner or count word, it is normal in Cantonese, but in Mandarin, you should not omit the ...


4

I believe 慢工出细货 is good enough. Although it doesn't mention about care explicitly, it is strongly implied as much care have to be given to produce a delicate product (as 细 means 细緻 here), and it takes time to breed that work (慢工).


4

Chinese language doesn't have tense. To indicate event happened in the past, you need to add time reference in the context or verb particle that indicate past verb Example: 我的朋友今年在美国(住过) = My friend (had lived) in America this year 过 is a verb particle that indicates 'experienced' aspect of the verb ~ 我的朋友今年(曾住)在美国 = My friend (had lived) in America ...


4

My friend is living in America this year. 我朋友今年住在美国。 My friend lived in America for a while this year. 我朋友今年在美国住了一段时间。 Does 'for a while' count as extra info??


3

Many of them will actually use the English word, as weird as that sounds. This is true mostly with younger and more educated Chinese people. Here is a video of it actually being used in a very natural setting. Skip to 3:58. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqUpsXF4Yu8


3

What about: "Shoot!" "Shoot; it's raining." "Shoot; I forgot to bring my phone." "Shoot; I'm late." "Darn." "Darn, it's raining." "Darn! I forgot to bring my phone." "Darn; I'm late." "Oh no." "Oh no, it's raining." "Oh no. I forgot to bring my ...


3

看不起 + 某物品 (something) 表示 觉得这个物品没有价值,不值得拥有。 Indicates that you think that thing is worthless or not worth having 看不起 + 某人 (someone) 表示 觉得这个人某方面能力或某方面不好,带贬义。 Indicates that you think this person is, in some respect, bad. Pejorative term. 看不上 + 某人 (someone) 觉得这个人不适合。 比如团队需要人,选择男女朋友时。 You think this person is unsuitable. For instance, when a team is ...


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