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First, let's look at why 沙 (sand) is related to 水(water) Sand is found mostly on 滩岸 (beach and shore), close to a body of water (ocean, river, etc.) Sand is created by water eroding rock like water, sand can 流動 (flow) 漠: 北方流沙也。——《说文》 (漠 = flowing/ moving sand in the north) A desert is in effect, an ocean of sand. Therefore, it is closely related to ...


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In short, 買單 comes from 埋單 because Cantonese 埋 (tone 4, 陽平, contour 21 or 11) sounds very similar to Mandarin 買 (tone 3, 上聲, contour 214) where the ending rise isn't sounded when followed by 單. Here Cantonese 埋 means to "settle", "finish off", or "draw near". E.g. 埋數 (finish off the numbers / do accounting), 埋位 (settle in to a ...


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如“脱口秀”“买单”; Ah, what were they thinking back then ... ?? 埋 : 土: earth, ground, 里:in: 土 + 里 together: bury 單 : 口口 : cries, trouble + 甲 armour, protect + 一 one Decomposition notes 字形分解说明 [?]: (- probably a sling, 田 is the pocket and rock and lower line is path of rock) (- possibly a cicada, two big eyes and a body) (- original 单蝉單蟬 chán) (- some think it is a ...


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买 = buy 单 = bill Direct translate would be "buy the bill". In general when we use the word 买单, we always say it to the waitress/waiter when we wanted to pay the bill in an restaurant. Not in any other shop, only in the restaurant we do that. But when we really try to understand 买单, it is actually as it is translated directly, buy the bill! It ...


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Xiandai Hanyu Cidian (现代汉语词典, Modern Chinese Dictionary): 买单1 mǎidān: NOUN. A document in a financial market that serves as proof of purchase. 买单2 mǎidān: VERB, Dialect. See "埋单" in page 865. ... 埋单 máidān: VERB. Pay the bill after having meals in restaurants, referring to paying in general. Came from Cantonese, when introduced into the northern ...


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I believe this word uses the "coordinate" compounding structure. If we interpret both of the characters as verbs, then the compound would consist of two words with similar meanings, like 觀察 (observe observe), 成長(grow grow), 減弱 (v.) (reduce deprived/cease to have) As someone has mentioned, 減肥 (go on a diet, lit. reduce fat) seems to have the ...


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It may help if you analyze 减弱 in terms of a verb plus an adjectival complement of result, i.e. the subject NP reduces, with the result that it is weak.


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In "减肥", "肥" is the target and 减 is the action. However in "减弱", this is a verb as a whole, 弱 is NOT the TARGET。 When you say "强度减弱",强度 is the target, 减 is the action, and 弱 is the result/status after the action. It literally means "减 something and 使 something 弱" (don't speak this way). A similar example is ...


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肥 in 减肥 is a noun; 弱 in 减弱 is an adjective 减肥 = 减(少)肥(胖) = reduce obesity 减弱 = 减(低)(變)弱 decrease and weaken Example: "颱風减弱" = "颱風(威力)减(低)(變)弱" = "Typhoon (power) decreases and weakens" The power decreased and the typhoon became weaker


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Following a verb with 的 is known as nominalization. If you take the verb 喝 (to drink) for example, typically you'd put the subject before the verb and the object after. For example, 我喝牛奶 (I drink milk). Nominalization requires that either the subject or the object be missing, in such a scenario you would combine the clause with 的 to represent the missing ...


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If you take an English sentence like: There are people who believe the earth is flat. We can see a similar phenomenon to that in Chinese. The phrasing of there are tells us that it is not everybody who believes the earth is flat but that some people hold this conviction. Likewise, 有的 plays a similar role. You already know that 有 expresses something akin to,...


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