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馬(horse) is related to 戲(play/ perform) 戲 is related to 假; 扮 (fake; pretend) 假; 扮 is related to 騙 (trick) In ancient times, children would hold a stick between their legs to pretend to ride a horse, the idiom 青梅竹馬 illustrated it graphically, it is similar to what the performers did in Chinese opera. The opera couldn't use real horses on stage, so they used a ...


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A word on rebus (假借): assume I were to create an emoji writing system for English. I don't exactly have an emoji for the verb 'to leave'; but what if I use a pre-existing emoji 🌿 'leaf' to represent the meaning 'to leave' instead, based on their similarity in pronunciation? Now we can't possibly link the meaning of 'leaf' to 'to leave' (much like how you ...


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“Add oil” – what does it mean? It represents the metaphor of injecting fuel into a tank, or alternatively, stepping on an accelerator to propel a vehicle forward. But the use of “add oil” as an expression of encouragement is a creation of Cantonese: ga yao, or jiayou in Mandarin. Often accompanied by exclamation marks, it is a versatile phrase Chinese ...


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It seems we all agree 迁 means to move. It's a verb to me and 就 is likely to be a noun. Referring from this website https://baike.baidu.com/item/%E5%B0%B1/1942923?fr=aladdin#7_1. In 古文解释 《说文解字》,就,高也。从京从尤。尤,异於凡也。saying that the meaning of 就 is "tall", "away from (being) ordinary" (I'm not sure about 从高从尤 but I think it's about pronunciation)...


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You can't use 就 to express 迁就。 You can't use 迁 to express 迁就 That's why there is a 就 in 迁就。


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就 here means to approach, to move toward. For example, 以碗就口 means when eating, move the rice bowl toward one's mouth. The other way around would be 以口就碗. This is the way animals such as dogs and cats eat. They move their mouth toward the bowl to eat. 遷就 means one changes/gives up one's will/desire and choose/adapt to other's will/desire.


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Why is there a 就 in 迁就? 迁, like the English word "move", is too indefinite / general to be of much use in specific situations. So, if we want to say "to move / to shift / to change" one's position physically, you say 迁移, (like migrating to somewhere) However, if it is to "to move / to shift / to change / to alter" one's position ...


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After a long discussion about 就, I concluded that there are three basic definitions of 就 1.then; right away 2.only; just 3.near; close to 迁 = move 就 = close to 迁就: to accommodate; yield to The idiom 移船就磡 is a good example of why 迁就 means 'to accommodate' -- The ship moves to get close and fit into the port, not the other way around. In short, a ship must ...


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If you parse 遷就 very literally, they both mean 'to move', but 就 here is a verb which also means 'to move towards (sb.)'. Of course it doesn't mean 接近 'to approach (sb.)' here; it's more figurative. I guess you could think of that as saying, you yield yourself to someone. (Just a side note: the unwillingness / negative connotation is less in 遷就 than 將就) ...


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就 has the sense of 依从 (to yield or accommodate oneself to) by itself as in 半推半就, 迁就. Colloquially, we have a word 就手(儿) which denotes a similar sense. E. g. 我就手儿把这事办了。


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You'd better refer to these links: https://www.zhihu.com/question/20010669/answer/26173785 https://www.zhihu.com/question/22107477/answer/20311667 https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E9%AC%BB#Etymology https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%F0%A7%B6%A0#Chinese The word {congee} was first denoted by (here 毓 denotes its pronunciation and 䰜 stands for cooking utensils) ...


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"淘气" was not a Mandarin word at first. It is from dialect. 淘 ①耗费:~神。②<方>顽皮。 -Modern Chinese Dictionary, 2nd Edition, The Commercial Press, 1983, Beijing 《现代汉语词典》(第2版) Some dialect word appeared a long time ago. Some of them use words that are not common in today's Mandarin. Probably when "淘气" appeared, it was not written like this....


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