5 votes
Accepted

How would I say "change the laundry"?

把衣服从洗衣机拿出来放在干衣机里 or 把衣服拿出来烘干 or 把衣服烘干 is the correct answer. 烘 means heat up objects with hot/warm air 我觉得国内绝大多数家庭里都不用干衣机吧,通常都是晾干或者晒干, 至少我家是不用干衣机的(虽然有洗干一体机) 所以没有对应 change the laundry 的说法好像也很正常。
  • 531
3 votes

How would I say "change the laundry"?

@Virgil Ming: neither is a dishwasher!! 'change the laundry' is somewhat idiomatic! Stick the wet washing in the dryer please. 请吧洗好的衣服放进烘干机。
  • 15.7k
3 votes

十万八千里 meaning great distance?

It probably came from the storybook "西遊記". Below is conservation between "孫悟空(行者)", 沙僧 and 八戒: 沙僧道:「師兄,我們到雷音寺有多少遠?」 行者道:「十萬八千里。十停中還不曾走了一停哩。」 八戒道:「哥啊,要走幾年才得到?」 行者道:「這些路,若認二位賢弟,...
  • 7,387
2 votes
Accepted

What is the translation of "objet trouvé" into Chinese?

This is from my dictionary: Object trouve - [法] (偶然发现并被认为具有艺术价值的)天然艺术品 In your writing, you may say: "偶然(無意間)發現的天然艺术品". Depending on the context, "的" can be replaced by "了&...
  • 7,387
2 votes

What is the translation of "objet trouvé" into Chinese?

Average Chinese don't know what 发现物体 means in this context is because it is an artist's lingo. I am an artist so I can understand it refers to "random unconventional art material". In layman'...
  • 70.9k
1 vote

What is the translation of "objet trouvé" into Chinese?

The very closely related concept or even a synonym, ready-made, is often called “现成物” (existing object), e.g. https://wap.cnki.net/touch/web/Dissertation/Article/10560-1011206906.nh.html; https://www....
  • 582
1 vote
Accepted

十万八千里 meaning great distance?

There doesn't seem to be a definitive answer, but one possibility is that the number 108,000 is derived from the 108 auspicious symbols in Tibetan Buddhism. Each of these symbols is said to bring good ...
1 vote

How would I say "change the laundry"?

"change the laundry" isn't proper English either. You probably mean "put the laundry in the dryer".
1 vote

How would I say "change the laundry"?

There really isn’t such a dedicated concise phrase. Dryer hasn’t been a thing in common household of China.
1 vote
Accepted

Does Chinese have an adage saying “It is better to hit to kill than to hit and injure”?

It appears to be: 撞伤不如撞死 although it's not very commonly used; Googling "撞伤不如撞死" gives 83 results. It breaks down as follows: 撞伤 = "bruise / bump" 不如 = "not equal to / not ...
  • 13.9k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible