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17

Q is Chinese slang for "chewy", similar to al dente in texture. You can see it in example phrases such as "Q感十足" (very chewy). You would expect foods such as tapioca pearls, gelatinous candies, pasta, or rice to be described as "Q". From my experience, this term is more popular in Taiwan and Hong Kong and less so in the mainland. I have not seen this term ...


13

Wiki page of 牛排 gives a clue of its etymology, written by, 姚德懷, the current chairman of 香港中國語文學會 (The Chinese Language Society of Hong Kong Ltd.), a non-profit organization in Hong Kong. Here's a summary: According to 漢語大詞典, the word 牛排 has been cited in some novels in Qing Dynasty in the beginning of 20th century. Such as: 「三荷包接過看時,只見上面開的是:清牛湯、炙鰣魚、冰蠶阿、...


13

Yup. The typical phrase spoken when serving food is qǐng màn yòng (請慢用). It lliterally means "please eat slowly", but is better translated as "enjoy your meal", and serves the same function as the French bon appétit.


11

Like Semaphore said 请慢用 is good for very formal circumstances. In less formal circumstances you can say something like 慢慢吃 - which basically has the same meaning. This can also be used among family and friends.


10

Q is Hokkien. The character is「食邱」and pronounced ㄎㄧㄨ (kiu, same as "Q"). The Chinese definition is 軟靭 ruǎn rèn (soft and tough) and means the texture of food being chewy. See the post "Q(k‘iu⊦)──軟靭" on the "taiwanlanguage" blog.


10

马铃薯 (commonly known as 土豆 in Northeastern China) is the general term for potato. (炸/马铃)薯条 is commonly understood as French fries (hot chips). By default, both 炸 and 马铃 are redundant. 土豆条 and 炸土豆条 are the less common terms for French fries. Other related terms: 薯片 - potato chips / potato crisps / packet chips 薯泥 - mashed potato 薯餅 - hash brown 烤马铃薯 - baked ...


10

It's nothing to do with 麦 (grains). From wikipedia, 烧卖,又称稍麦、烧麦、捎卖、稍美、干蒸、烧梅、肖米、鬼蓬头。 烧卖及其他与之谐音的名称的来由有多种说法,没有定论。 It's explained a little in the English version. The name was given "捎卖", meaning the product was "sold as a sideline", with tea. The name was later transformed into modern forms like "烧麦", "稍美" and "烧卖", changing the characters ...


9

in ancient time, "辛" was used, in lieu of 辣. e.g. in 洪範: 潤下作鹹﹒炎上作苦﹒曲直作酸﹒從革作辛﹒稼穡作甘 http://ctext.org/shang-shu/great-plan/zh?searchu=潤下作鹹,炎上作苦,曲直作酸,從革作辛,稼穡作甘%E3%80%82&searchmode=showall#result nowadays, dictionary would explain 五味 as 甜﹒酸﹒苦﹒辣﹒鹹, instead of older terms 甘﹒酸﹒苦﹒辛﹒鹹 http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=...


8

The full Chinese name of KFC is 肯德基炸鸡, but it was shorten to 肯德基 currently. The word Kentucky, was translated into 肯德基 in Chinese intentionally, in order to distinguish with Kentucky State, while 肯德基 and 肯塔基 are same word in English actually. I think it is because that KFC is a influential foreign brand in early period, Chinese may know what it is now when ...


8

「乒乓大方卜」 refers to a biscuit-product-line name cap ping pong (Malay for ping-pong brand, forming the 「乒乓」 part) and large square thin crackers (「大方薄餅乾」; 「餅乾」 is omitted and 「卜」 is a phonetic substitution of 「薄」, meaning thin, forming the 「大方卜」 part). The Hup Seng (合成) company has three snack product lines, one of them named cap ping pong On their website (...


7

The 2010 book "Jews and Judaism in Modern China", by M. Avrum Ehrlich, translates kosher as jieshi. Both the Pleco and KTdict iOS apps also offer 洁食(*jieshi*) as a translation for kosher.


7

马 means 马氏, the family name. 大碗 - big bowl; large quantity. (马氏)(大碗拉面) The company was established in 1993. It registered the name 马师傅马大碗.


7

https://baike.baidu.com/item/%E5%B7%A8%E6%97%A0%E9%9C%B8/1226195 巨无霸 (巨毋霸) was a historical character who was famous for being a giant. Later people commonly use '巨无霸' as a nickname for something that is 'giant size'. For example, compare to modern dragonfly's modest 1-4 inches length, the dragonfly- like Meganeuropsis was no doubt a 'giant'(巨无霸) with it's ...


6

They both mean tomato, In mainland China, 西红柿 is used more often while in Taiwan 番茄 is more used.


6

醡醬麵 and 炸醬麵 炸醬麵 can work as it means "noodles with fried sauce" 醡醬麵 is "noodles with extracted sauce (e.g. extracting oil)" 炸 fried (火 fire radical + phonetic 乍 zhà) 醡 extract (酉 container + 窄 narrow; from 穴 hole and 乍) Archaic character for 榨 (tool for extraction process. 木 wood used to refer to tools in this case) 醬 sauce 麵 noodles Alternatively, 酢醬麵 ...


6

Any of these sentences would be grammatically correct. However 我要一份青椒肚片不要(加)大蒜 would be a better and more common usage in my opinion. It would be even better to include the character in the parenthesis, 加 which means "add" or "with" or "include".


6

The Chinese mostly call it "花卷" in daily life but you might regard it as a variant of "馒头" as well, if you apply the concept of "馒头" broadly. It's just that it more usually comes with some flavoring compared with 馒头 which can be plain. Apparently there's a Wikipedia entry for it https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandarin_roll


6

'辣' is not a accurate word for the taste that we mean. For example, as the answers above, garlic (大蒜) tastes '辣', ginger (生姜) tastes '辣', and mustard (芥末‌) also tastes '辣'. These three ones are the typical '辣' spices that have been used in cooking and meals since the very long before the chilli peppers entered. However, they have completely different tastes.


6

You don't really have to give a formal reply. Similar scenario: A Chinese arrives home and sits on his own sofa. His wife may see him and asks "回来了?". It's like "hi" in a specific context. So next time you may just node and smile. Feeling awkward not to utter a word? "嗯" is enough.


6

I worked in restaurants for many years. As I understand it, '肉' in Chinese menus only refers to pork unless it is specifically stated what kind of meat it is. For example: 時菜炒(豬)肉片 = in-season vegetable stir-fry pork slice 時菜炒牛肉 = in-season vegetable stir-fry beef (豬)肉絲湯麵 = shredded pork noodle soup 雞絲湯麵 = shredded chicken meat noodle soup (豬) is omitted ...


5

鴛鴦 is actually the name of a bird; more specifically, the mandarin duck. Here's an image: (Look at how cute they are!) In Chinese culture, the mandarin duck is a symbol of lovers, much like the lovebird in English culture. The term 鸳鸯 is often used to describe pairs of things that make a good match. As for your drink, this most likely refers to the ...


5

《懶蟲簡明英漢詞典》 go Dutch verb 各人付自己的帳 Usually, we simply say 各付各的 or 各出各的 in both TC and SC. Others: 各付各的帳 各付一半帳 各付一半賬 各付帳 各人付自己的帳 各人自付錢 各人自己付錢 各自付錢 各自付帳 各自負擔自己費用 According to the legend of the Anglo-Dutch scramble for colonies and competition for the international trade market, because of the frequent conflict ...


4

When I first saw the question title, I thought you were looking for a way to express the statement 'I love spicy food', which is what 我爱辣 sounds like. Although grammatical, 我爱辣 doesn't sound very natural, probably because the pronunciation of 辣 is close to the tone particle 啦. A more natural expression is 我爱吃辣, in which 吃 (eat) nails la4 into the context of ...


4

This happens when the food can be cooked with (little or much) or without spicy. People ask how should the food cook for you, 我爱辣 (a weird expression) answers this question indirectly -- I like spicy so please put a lot of it in the food. The direct answers could be: 不要 (bùyào) / 不要辣 (bùyào là) / 不放辣椒 (bù fàng làjiāo) "cook without spicy" 微辣 (wēi là) / 少放点 (...


4

In Taiwanese 蚵仔 (ô á), in Taiwan Mandarin 牡蛎 (mǔ lì). There's also 蛤蠣 (há lì) but this means clams.


4

They are different words used by people from different parts of China, just like aubergine and eggplant for English speakers from different regions. This is very common in Chinese,like potatoes(土豆,洋芋,马铃薯 and more), pineapples(菠萝,凤梨)... Is one version used more in different regions than others? I would rather say that people from northern China only used ...


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