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「乒乓大方卜」 refers to a biscuit-product-line name cap ping pong (Malay for ping-pong brand, forming the 「乒乓」 part) and large square thin crackers (「大方薄餅乾」; 「餅乾」 is omitted and 「卜」 is a phonetic substitution of 「薄」, meaning thin, forming the 「大方卜」 part). The Hup Seng (合成) company has three snack product lines, one of them named cap ping pong On their website (...


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It is just a name, whoever named this fruit deemed it mythically good. Put exaggerated words in commercial goods' names is a common practice. There's a Toronto car repairman nicknamed himself 車神 (god of cars) to brag about his godly car repairing skill, you can't take names like these literally The funny thing is, just like 地瓜 (sweet potato) is not a 瓜 (...


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Wikipedia has an entire page entitled, Peaches of Immortality, where it gives an explanation to the term: In Chinese mythology, Peaches of Immortality (Chinese: 仙桃; pinyin: xiāntáo; Cantonese Yale: sīn tòuh or Chinese: 蟠桃; pinyin: pántáo; Cantonese Yale: pùhn tòuh) are consumed by the immortals due to their mystic virtue of conferring longevity on all who ...


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In your case, you can say 这道菜马马虎虎. Similar use 这台电视马马虎虎。 It can also be used adverbally. E. g. 他歌唱得马马虎虎。


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To express a mediocre taste, I think it's better to say 這道菜[很普通/平淡無奇]。 馬虎 is generally used when we wish to comment on someone’s attitude. It may be used when you wish to criticise someone’s preparation of the dish as sloppy: 這道菜做得馬馬虎虎。 (lit.) This dish is done in a sloppy manner. The sense 'so-so' (還過得去 in Cihai's definition), as in 這道菜,馬馬虎虎吧。 (lit.) ...


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Why didn't "Rake up; gather up" make sense to you? 腿絲(扒)芥膽 = Shredded Ham (raked up/ gathered up on) Mustard 北菇(扒)菜膽 = Northern Mushroom (raked up/ gathered up on) Vegetable 蟹肉(扒)雙蔬 = Crab Meat (raked up/ gathered up on) Double Vegetables 扒 (on top) -- one ingredient laid on the top of another ingredient and the two do not mix (this way, one ...


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