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12

The traditional Chinese letter is very complex.It has many honorifics that vary greatly for different receivers. But today,most people's traditional education is insufficient to write these letter. For email,people tend to write simply and practicably。 Habitual formation。 example: 周老师: 您好! ...


9

I will give you a example, explanation in the brackets, see if it's useful to you. this is a email I sent to my client, I think this format is kind of formal 孔经理:(he's a manager, and his family name is Kong, it's impolite to call somebody's name in a formal letter) blablabla 此致(this word means "I finish my word here" or "this is the end of this ...


6

Alter words: 谢谢:多谢,感谢,谢恩(古代臣子百姓对君王说的) 对不起:抱歉,有愧,歉仄 As your case, 對不起現在才回覆您。 謝謝你的幫助! rephrase: (非常)抱歉现在才回复您。 (十分)感谢您的帮助!


6

If you are looking for an exact English translation, the answer is that there isn't one. It is a tradition in Chinese culture. When you are talking about/to other people, you should butter him/her up by exaggerating his/her achievements, wealth, position and etc. And do the opposite thing when talking about yourself. It's all about being polite (when ...


5

“哀伤” is usually a noun, while “悲伤” and “悲哀” are usually adjective. “哀伤”, “悲伤” both could mean severe sadness, and are often used in the context that one has lost someone he loved or something he valued. 任何语言都无法形容他失去亲人的哀伤。 No words could describe the sorrow of losing his family. 刚刚失去亲人的他看起来十分悲伤。 Having lost his family, he looks very sad. Though “悲哀” could ...


4

usually, a Chinese won't use 您 to his parents. it's used only for a non-closed friend, a business member for example. Using an appellation with 你 instead. for example: 妈妈,你坐。 is better than 妈妈,您坐。 except that women is not your mother but your wife's. BTW, 您 don't have a plural form, turns to 你们 instead.


4

When addressing the listener's family, a prefix 令 (ling4, which has a meaning of good, lucky) can be used: 令尊, your father 令堂, your mother 令郎, your son 令嫒, your daughter 令兄, your elder brother 令弟, your younger brother 令姊, your elder sister 令妹, your younger sister Correspondingly, when addressing the speaker's own family, a prefix 家(jia1, which means home, ...


3

Let me tell you, 悲伤 is pure sadness and can be used widely, 哀伤 also means sadness but usually be used in poems and essays for emphasis, 悲哀 is a little bit sadness but more showing pity or regretful.


3

As you mention this is complex and subtle and likely depends on upbringing and which area you come from. I have heard my wife use 您 when talking to her mother, but not this is not a regular thing. From the conversations I remember, this is usually at times when my wife wants to discuss something difficult with her mother or when she is asking her to look ...


3

您高就 = (请问)您(在哪里)高就? Direct translation is: May I ask where you work? The question is in a very formal and polite way.


3

In my considered opinion: Directly, 您- you (second person pronoun, formal) 高- high (adj.) 就- achievement. However 就 here comes from 成就 which means achievement. The interrogative turn would thus mean "Where are you achieving (i.e. working and attaining (hopefully!) praise and achievement)". As for the non-interrogative turn I would consider it just a ...


3

"最近如何" is used by educated people, you will hear which in formal occasions. But if you are in entertaining places or simply walking along a street, then yes, "最近怎樣" will be more frequently heard. This distinction may resemble the distinction between "How do you do" and "How's it going". Modern young kids seldom use "how do you do" to replace "how's it going"...


3

You should use 您 in 謝謝你的幫助!, not 你 That will be more polite


2

I am Chinese. If you asked me “最近如何”? I wouldn't feel it's formal at all. There could be difference between these two in other contexts, but definitely not here. Say if you want to write something in letter and want it to be formal. Try “最近可好”?


2

You can write 非常感谢...但很抱歉....


2

Encl. means "附件 (fù jiàn)" in Chinese. You can say 请查看附件 (qǐng chá kàn fù jiàn) means "Please check the enclosed files" in English to alert your recipient.


2

I don't think that is the case. 悲哀 is perhaps used more often, which gives the feeling that it is less formal.. But if you asked me, I would say they are interchangeable and convey the same feeling. On the other hand. Some might say they differ in severity. 哀伤 悲伤悲哀 decrease in degree of sadness. But the difference is so subtle and subjective that I don't ...


2

I think the above answers are right. If you want to be VERY FORMAL in a written letter, you can use ancient expressions. Taiwanese still use them nowadays in formal letters. Ancient ways to express gratitude in written letter: 承蒙关注,特此感谢。承蒙关照,不胜感激。请接受我的谢忱。费神之处,不胜感激,来示读悉;十分感谢。厚情盛意,应接不遑,切谢切谢。劳神为谢。费神之处,泥首以谢。感荷高情,非言语所能鸣谢。承赐忠言,心感何极。承蒙谆谆忠告,铭感铭感。承蒙见教,获益甚多。承示诚挚之言,...


2

There are many ways to say it. The 6 pairs below arranged from polite with respect --> polite --> demanding w/patience --> demanding w/impatience. 1a - 我不太瞭解您的意思, 可以請您解釋解釋嗎? 1b - 我不太瞭解您所說的, 可以請您解釋一下嗎? 2a - 我不太瞭解您的意思, 可以麻煩您解釋解釋嗎? 2b - 我不太瞭解您所說的, 可以麻煩您解釋一下嗎? 3a - 我不瞭解你的意思, 勞駕解釋解釋好嗎? 3b - 我不瞭解你所說的, 勞駕解釋一下好嗎? 4a - 我不瞭解你的意思, 解釋解釋好吧? 4b - 我不瞭解你所說的, 解釋一下好吧?...


1

The text sounds very official and formal 若 (if) 承租人 (tenant) 是 (is) 公司 (company) 则 (then) 必须 (must) 提供 (provide) 法定 (legal) 代表人 (representative) 资料 (information) 若承租人是公司,则必须提供法定代表人资料。 If the tenant is a company, then it must provide the information of the legal representative I think 法定(legal) is not needed, since the representative is bonded by a legal ...


1

Say 你好 (Hello) first It sounds more formal to state what company you are from before stating your name. "我是 xxx 公司的客服 yyy" or "我是 xxx 公司的客服, 我的名字是 yyy" Since you are speaking with the customer on the phone, "打过来的" or "给您打电话了" is redundant. Just like you wouldn't need to say "I am talking to you in person" ...


1

Consider 敬上 书信 古代用于书信结尾的敬语或谦词,表示对收信人的尊敬。现多见于日语。 用法: ......(正文) xxx(写信人) 敬上 I've received many messages set-up this way. "Thank you for your time" or "Thank you for your consideration" are very English-isms, you're best just to go with the Chinese way to do things.


1

At first glance, I thought that it's just 高就 which means "promote in work". But according to your explanation, I wonder if it's a polite question asking "Where do you work?" Grammatically, 高 means "high(ly)" and 就 means "occupy oneself" or "occupy (a position)". P.S. Some examples from the first few pages at Google: 我小心问道:“施叔叔,请问您高就?” I asked him ...


1

I second what Stan said; I've never heard anyone call their parents by 您. Usually, if it is a friend, co worker, family member, 你 is usually fine 您 is a respectful/formal way to address elders, guests, people of distinction (addressing a professor). Keep in mind, in both formal and informal situations, I hardly have heard people speak 您好。 I usually see ...


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